A father who lost three fingers in a horrific motorbike smash has them replaced… with two of his TOES

Father who lost three fingers in a horrific motorbike smash has them replaced… with two of his TOES
Jonas Barber lost three fingers during a motorbike race in Lincolnshire
The toe next to big toe on each foot was removed and attached to his right hand in 12-hour operation last year
'They aren't the prettiest of things but I don't really care,' says 31-year-old

. Prof Kay carried out the UK's first hand transplant on Mark Cahill in December.

Prof Kay, seen as a pioneer in his field, used the toe next to the big toe from each of Jonas' feet, providing him with large enough digit substitutes without causing him problems with balance.

The professor usually carries out the procedure on babies and very young children and says adult patients are very rare.

Mr Barber said he was looking forward to getting back on his motorbike and holding a pint of beer

Mr Barber said he was looking forward to getting back on his motorbike and holding a pint of beer

Mr Barber (right) during a motorbike race. He said he didn't care that his new hand wasn't the 'prettiest of things' as it worked

Mr Barber (right) racing his motorbike on the day of the accident. He said he didn't care that his new hand wasn't the 'prettiest of things' as it worked

He said: 'People think that if you're operating on youngsters it's more tricky because they're small. But it's not, if anything it's more difficult working with the size of an adult's body.

'In the case of Jonas he was a great patient because he has the right personality – he doesn't want to be dramatic or make a big fuss, he just wants to sort himself out and get on with his life.'

The procedure involves re-attaching the bone, nerves, arteries, tendons, ligaments and skin of the toe to the hand.

However, Prof Kay said: 'It wasn't really complicated surgery. For me and my amazing team, it was relatively straight-forward.

'The operation gives you some feeling, some movement, some power. We aren't trying to create something beautiful, we're trying to create something functional.'

Mr Barber said his children were particularly relieved by the outcome.

'When I first had the accident we
initially told my youngest daughter my fingers would grow back,' he said.

'Since
I've had the toes sewn onto my hand she thinks that's exactly what
happened – and we aren't about to tell her any different.'

Mr Barber pictured on the day of the accident with his daughter Freya. He told her his fingers would grow back

Mr Barber pictured on the day of the accident with his daughter Freya. He told her his fingers would grow back