Benefit cheat mother, 23, is now 64 a week better off after DWP rules she is entitled to MORE than the amount she was stealing

Benefit cheat mother, 23, is now 64 a week better off after DWP rules she is entitled to MORE than the amount she was stealing
Claimed 64 a week illegally but is told she can now receive 130Worked for a clothes shop and NHS trust while claiming income supportHer lawyer described mitigation as 'most ridiculous' he had ever broughtOrdered to do 80 hours community service and pay 100 court costs

, Macclesfield Magistrates' Court heard she would not have qualified for any payouts.

Gibbons' lawyer Mr Julian Farley said: 'This case is extraordinary and perhaps an indictment of the benefits system.

'If you work out what the overpayment was on the income support over 11 months, it's about 66 per week of overpayment.

'Immediately after the fraud was found
the income support stopped and her benefits were adjusted. Miss Gibbons
was then entitled to make a claim for family tax credit and child
benefits.

'She's now receiving 130 per week – 64 more than she was fraudulently claiming in the first place.

'Her fraudulent behaviour was in
effect saving the government money. It is the most ridiculous mitigation
I have ever had bring before a court – quite ridiculous.'

Gibbons claimed money while working at two different places

Gibbons claimed money while working at two different places

Gibbons fraudulently claimed 64 a week – she has now been told she is entitled to 130 a week in handouts

She admitted benefit fraud and the court heard she had been compliant with the DWP after they contacted her when they received a tip off.

For the benefit fraud she was ordered to complete 80 hours unpaid work under the terms of a 12 month community order and pay 100 costs.

Magistrate Susan Armstrong said: 'You were charged with a fraudulent claim for benefits. You claimed for a sustained period of time and did this intentionally. This is taking money away from the public purse.'

The mother-of-one worked at Strawberry Moon and an NHS trust while claiming income support

The mother-of-one worked at Strawberry Moon and an NHS trust while claiming income support

Matthew Sinclair, Chief Executive of
the TaxPayers' Alliance, said: 'This case shows just how extraordinarily
complex the welfare system is.

'It beggars belief that somebody going
to the lengths of making fraudulent claims would've actually received
more in benefits had they been honest about their situation.

'It just goes to show that the current
system is broken and doesn't provide the right incentives for claimants
to go back to work.

'Welfare reform is long overdue and a
simpler system will not only save taxpayers a huge amount of money, it
will ensure that the right people get the right support.'