Dutch artist transforms public eyesores into works of art by camouflaging them into background using paint

Have I got views for loo! Artist camouflages public toilets and other ugly structures so they're hidden against their backgrounds
Roeland Otten has used mosaics and geometric paint designs
Designer recreated otherwise blocked and lost views of the city streets

By
Larisa Brown

PUBLISHED:

00:38 GMT, 31 January 2013

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UPDATED:

08:51 GMT, 31 January 2013

An artist has transformed ugly run-down public structures into works of art by camouflaging them into their background using paint.

Dutch designer Roeland Otten has used mosaics, geometric paint designs, and high resolution photograph wall coverings to recreate the otherwise blocked and lost views of the city streets.

He has managed to turn an air quality measuring station, an electricity substation and a public toilet in Amsterdam into artistic creations.

An artist has transformed public eyesores into works of art by blending them in with the background. Pictured is a photograph printed on aluminum in Rotterdam

An artist has transformed public eyesores into works of art by blending them in with the background. Pictured is a photograph printed on aluminum in Rotterdam

Camouflage: This piece of art looks so similar to its background that some passers-by may have to do a double take

Camouflage: This piece of art looks so similar to its background that some passers-by may have to do a double take

Mosaic tiles make up an interesting design on this structure in an urban street in Amsterdam

Mosaic tiles make up an interesting design on this structure in an urban street in Amsterdam

His aim is to disguise eyesores on picturesque urban streets and pathways and rejuvenate the area by doing so.

His City Camouflage project, featured in Dezeen magazine, includes a pixelated view of Jan van Galenstraat shopping street in Amsterdam using tiles.

Otten's project began in 2009 with the transformation of a former electricity substation on the corner of Graaf Floristraat and Heemraadsingel in Rotterdam.

A high resolution photograph recreates the otherwise blocked and lost views of the city streets

A high resolution photograph recreates the otherwise blocked and lost views of the city streets

This photograph mimics the background perfectly as the tree behind the structure continues in the image

This photograph mimics the background perfectly as the tree behind the structure continues in the image

Mosaic tiles on an air quality measuring station in Amsterdam

A modern design is painted on this ugly structure to make it a work of art

Mosaic tiles on an air quality measuring station in Amsterdam, left, and another public eyesore, right

Acrylic paint is used to transform a rusty electricity substation on the Boompjeskade waterfront in Rotterdam

Acrylic paint is used to transform a rusty electricity substation on the Boompjeskade waterfront in Rotterdam

He decorated the building in sheets of aluminium printed with high-resolution photographs of the surrounding streets, so that it seemed almost invisible among the houses and trees.

Last year he used acrylic paint to transform a rusty electricity substation on the Boompjeskade waterfront in Rotterdam.

The bold graphic paintwork makes the substation blend in with the water and foliage nearby.

An old public toilet building used to measure the quality of the air was used for another part of the project.