How much driving convictions add to your insurance bill: Premiums can more than double for drink-drivers

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How much driving convictions add to your insurance bill: Premiums can more than double for drink-drivers Those caught drunk at the wheel face paying 115% more on car insuranceMost common offence of speeding increases premiums by more than a thirdUninsured drivers pay 131% more than they would have paid in the first case

By
Ray Massey

PUBLISHED:

02:00 GMT, 27 February 2013

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UPDATED:

02:03 GMT, 27 February 2013

Drivers can see their insurance premiums double as a result of motoring convictions, research reveals today.

Those caught drunk at the wheel face paying 115 per cent more, while defective tyres invite a 69 per cent penalty.

Speeding, which accounts for almost two thirds of offences, increases premiums by more than a third.

Paying the cost: Drivers caught drunk behind the wheel face paying 155 per cent more on their car insurance

Paying the cost: Drivers caught drunk behind the wheel face paying 155 per cent more on their car insurance

Uninsured motorists, however, suffer the biggest hit – they typically have to pay 131 per cent more than the amount they should have been paying in the first case.

The research by insurer confused.com was based on almost five million insurance quotes issued from October to December last year. A fifth of the customers – 924,000 – had a driving conviction.

Gareth Kloet, the firm’s head of car insurance, said: ‘Any conviction will likely cause a change in the cost of car insurance and those with convictions could be paying out hundreds of pounds more than people with a clean licence.

‘If you do have a conviction you must disclose this on your policy. If you don’t disclose a conviction and you make a claim on your policy, your insurance company could refuse to pay the claim.’

The firm took as its baseline for the typical motorist a 30-year-old female marketing manager who has a Mini Cooper and pays 682 for her insurance. A speeding conviction would see her policy rise 34 per cent – or 231 – to 913, says confused.com. But a driver with a riskier profile could see this exceed 1,000.

A spokesman for confused.com added: ‘There is a huge difference to the cost of car insurance premiums for drivers with speeding convictions compared to those without.

Ringing up costs: Using a hand-held mobile to make a phone call or send a text message can lead to a 49 per cent rise in insurance costs

Ringing up costs: Using a hand-held mobile to make a phone call or send a text message can lead to a 49 per cent rise in insurance costs

‘In fact, not only will the driver’s insurance go up but they could also be faced with a fine of up to 1,200.’

Using a hand-held mobile to phone or text will see the same policy soar by 49 per cent – or 337 – to 1,019. Running a red light will lead to a 24 per cent rise – adding 162 to the policy, which will go up to 844. Those convicted of driving without insurance would face paying 1,578, an increase of 896.

The spokesman added: ‘First-time offenders may receive six points and a fine of 180. In the worst cases this can result in a complete ban and fines of 5,000. Finding insurance afterwards can be tough.’

The report also notes: ‘One defective or bald tyre could see drivers hit with a fine of up to 2,500 and three penalty points or up to 5,000 and six points for two defective tyres. If all four tyres were defective, the maximum fine could be as much as 10,000 with a whopping 12 penalty points.’ Driving without due care and attention will lead to a 51 per cent hike of 346 to 1,028.

And driving ‘otherwise than in accordance with a licence’ can lead to a 49 per cent rise of 331 to 1,013. This often includes drivers who drive solo on a provisional licence.

Nearly half of the convictions (49 per cent) related to speeding, followed by using a hand-held phone at the wheel (9.82 per cent) and running a red light (7.48 per cent).

Cost of being careless