Jason Owen: Man who let Baby P die is sent back in jail after breaching parole

Man who let Baby P die is sent back in jail after breaching paroleJason Owen, 41 back in prison after breaching conditions of bail
Jailed in 2009 for his part in toddler's death, but served just half 6 year termBaby P found dead in his bloodied cot in August 2007 after horrific abuse His mother, Tracey Connelly and her boyfriend Steven Barker also jailed

By
Amanda Williams

PUBLISHED:

08:24 GMT, 12 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

15:01 GMT, 12 April 2013

Jason Owen, one of a trio jailed over Baby P's death, who is said to be back in prison after breaching his parole

Jason Owen, one of a trio jailed over Baby P's death, who is said to be back in prison after breaching his parole

A man who was jailed for his part in Baby P's death is back in prison after breaching the conditions of his bail.

Jason Owen, 41, was jailed in 2009 for his part in the toddler's death, alongside the child's mother, Tracey Connelly, her boyfriend Steven Barker – and Owen's brother.

But he served just half of his six year sentence and was given parole in 2011.

He is now believed to be in category C Stafford Prison, where he has his own cell.

Owen, a National Front member and convicted arsonist, is said to have been trying to re-invent himself in a bid to disguise himself behind bars.

But a source has claimed he bears more resemblance to Joey Essex from ITV's The Only Way is Essex.

The source told The Sun: 'He has tried to reinvent himself, has lost weight, and is into his fitness.

'He looks more like Joey facially but without the tan – and there's not much Towie glamour in Stafford.'

A Parole Board spokesman told MailOnline that he did not know how Owen had breached his licence conditions.

Spokesman Glenn Gathercole said the recall had happened in November last year, and that the Parole Board had directed he should not be re-released until the end of his existing sentence.

Owen was originally given an indeterminate sentence, which meant he would have stayed in prison for ever, until the Parole Board judged he could come out.

However he appealed this, and his sentence was commuted down to a determinate sentence of six years, which meant he was automatically released at the halfway point.

Tracey Connelly and Steven Barker are both serving indeterminate sentences.

Stephen Barker, father of Baby Peter

Tracey Connelly, mother of Baby Peter

Peter's mother, Tracey Connelly (right), and her
boyfriend Steven Barker were also jailed in
2009 for causing or allowing the toddler's death

Peter Connelly was just 17 months old when he died in his mother's north London flat.

He
was found dead in his bloodied cot in August 2007 after horrific abuse
despite being on a council ‘at-risk’ list with 60 visits from social
workers, police and health staff in eight months.

Peter had suffered more than 50 injuries.

Peter's
mother, Tracey Connelly, her boyfriend Steven Barker – and Barker's
brother, Owen – were jailed in 2009 for causing or allowing the
toddler's death.

His death shocked Britain and led to huge reforms in children's services.

It was found that Owen, who was lodging with his brother, did not step in to stop the abuse of the toddler.

Relatives of Peter – dubbed Baby P – have demanded to know why Owen, who changed his name from Jason Barker, was back in prison.

They said they were hardly surprise to learn he was back in jail, and added: 'The authorities should now come clean and tell us exactly why he is back inside.'

Peter Connelly was just 17 months old when he died in his mother's north London flat. He was found dead in his bloodied cot in August 2007 after horrific abuse despite being on a council 'at-risk' list

Peter Connelly was just 17 months old when he died in his mother's north London flat. He was found dead in his bloodied cot in August 2007 after horrific abuse despite being on a council 'at-risk' list

The Ministry of Justice said that public protection was its priority.

A spokesman added: 'Public protection is our priority. Offenders released on licence are subject to a strict set of conditions and controls.

'If they fail to comply with their licence conditions, they are liable to be returned to custody.'