Meerkat faces spotted in pensioner Pamela Warriner"s garden fence


Wood you spot the meerkats Faces of three beady-eyed inquisitive creatures found in fence panel
Knot formation gives impression of grinning meerkat faces

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UPDATED:

16:44 GMT, 26 November 2012

Stunned
Pamela Warriner, 75, had to ‘compare the meerkat’ when she saw the faces of three of
the weasel-like animals engrained in her new garden fence.

The
knots in the grain of the wood appeared to form the beady eyes, pointy nose and
grinning mouth of the inquisitive creature.

And
the thin cut of the wood for the fence panels meant the impression has been repeated
three times over.

Pensioner Pamela Warriner, 75, spotted three meerkat faces peering out from her new fence panel

Wood you believe it: Pensioner Pamela Warriner, 75, couldn't believe her eyes when she spotted three meerkat faces peering out from her fence panel

Her
son Marius took a snap of the fence when he recently visited Pamela’s home in
Dover, Kent.

Marius,
38, a railway worker, said: 'The fence actually belongs to my mum’s neighbour,
it’s just a normal one you can buy from a DIY store.

'When
I went round to visit my mum I saw the markings on the fence for the first
time.

'I
couldn’t believe it when I saw these three faces that look like meerkats.

'Mum
and I compared the other side of the fence but that was normal.”

Meerkats
– Suricata suricatta in Latin – are from the Mongoose family and come from
central and south Africa.

Enlarge

The knots in the grain of the wood appeared to form the beady eyes, pointy nose and grinning mouth of the inquisitive creature

Knot an every day occurrence: The knots in the grain of the wood appeared to form the beady eyes, pointy nose and grinning mouth of the inquisitive creature

They
live in large families in burrows and work as a team with some standing on
their hind legs keeping look-out, thereby allowing the others to forage and
dig.

Meerkats
now have a cult following after they featured in TV adverts for insurance firm
Compare the Market.

Meerkats huddled together

Safety in numbers: Meerkats live in large families in burrows and work as a team with some standing on their hind legs keeping look-out, thereby allowing the others to forage and dig