No sex please we"re film stars! Hollywood cuts steamy scenes from blockbusters claiming moviegoers prefer special effects


Hollywood cleans up its act: Film bosses cut steamy scenes from blockbusters claiming moviegoers prefer special effects
Raunchy movies like Basic Instinct no longer a turn-on for film fans
Family-friendly films with handsome male leads now more lucrativeMore sex on TV and internet one of the factors behind changing cinematic landscape

By
Daily Mail Reporter

PUBLISHED:

12:00 GMT, 24 March 2013

|

UPDATED:

15:25 GMT, 24 March 2013

Sizzling sex scenes are increasingly being replaced by mind-boggling special effects in movie-goers' affections, according to film experts.

Where once steamy erotic passages were almost a staple in Hollywood productions, directors are increasingly moving the earth through computer-generated effects.

A study has found the rise of accessible pornography online and an increasing trend for women to chose which films couples watch has led directors on the path of change.

Sexually explicit movies like Basic Instinct, starring Sharon Stone, are no longer popular, with movie-goers preferring more wholesome scripts

Sexually explicit movies like Basic Instinct, starring Sharon Stone, are no longer popular, with movie-goers preferring more wholesome scripts

Special effects, such as in the the film The Day After Tomorrow, are much more likely to appeal to viewers, partly because women are now more inclined to choose films seen by couples

Special effects, such as in the the film The Day After Tomorrow, are much more likely to appeal to viewers, partly because women are now more inclined to choose films seen by couples

So rather than Sharon Stone provocatively uncrossing her legs in Basic Instinct, cinema-goers would rather be terrified by the lifelike representations of tsunamis washing away entire cities.

According to Vincent Bruzzese, president of the film division of market research company Ipsos, sex scenes have been disappearing from scripts over the past 18 months.

He told the Sunday Times: 'Sex scenes used to be written, no matter the plot, to spice up the trailer. But all that does today is get the film an adult-only rating and lose a younger audience.

'Today such scenes are written out by producers before they are even shot. They ask, 'Do we really even need the sex Can we fill the space with dazzling special effects instead and keep the family-friendly rating”'

He highlighted the contenders for this year's Oscars, such as the Silver Linings Playbook, had plenty of drama and violence but no explicit sex.

Kate Winslet in Titanic. Romantic plotlines are less of a feature in films than 20 years ago, with movies being R-rated more because of violence than sex

Kate Winslet in Titanic. Romantic plotlines are less of a feature in films than 20 years ago, with movies being R-rated more because of violence than sex

Nicole Kidman attends a special screening of Stoker at Curzon Soho in London, England.

Actor Ryan Gosling

Nicole Kidman's latest film, The Paperboy, features fleeting sex scenes but has flopped in the box office. Heartthrob Ryan Gosling's (right) more wholesome movies are proving more of a draw, especially for women

According to a marketing report prepared for Warner Bros, women over the age of 25 now make the majority of couple's decisions over which films to watch, preferring to see handsome male leads like Ryan Gosling than actresses acting out erotic scenes with no relation to the plot.

Ten years ago, 120 R-rated films – a 15 in Britain – made the US box office top ten but last year there were only 80 and most got their rating for the violence, rather than the sex.

Raunchy films may nearly be a thing of the past but with Fifty Shades of Grey set to be turned into a movie, that could be about to change

Raunchy films may nearly be a thing of the past but with Fifty Shades of Grey set to be turned into a movie, that could be about to change

In Britain, the percentage of adult-only films fell from 12% in 2001 to 8% in 2011.

The trend has left directors like Adrian Lyne, who made films including Fatal Attraction, struggling.

'Not in a thousand years (would erotic films be made today),' he said in Entertainment Weekly magazine. 'I can't think of the last relationship piece that was a success – which is apparently why I haven't done something for quite a while now.'

Paul Degarabedian, president of film analysis at Hollywood.com, said youngsters are now turning to the net and TV for sex.

'If the explicit sex scenes on TV shows such as Girls were made for cinema, they would get a certificate, which means newspapers would not advertise them, nor would most cinemas show them. TV can go much further than mainstream Hollywood, which is relatively chaste these days.'

Nicole Kidman's latest film, The Paperboy, features fleeting sex scenes but has yet to recuperate a quarter of its cost, while The Sessions, which earned Helen Hunt an Oscar nomination for her portrayal of a sex surrogate, has also struggled.

But one film which could potentially reignite the ailing genre is Fifty Shades of Grey, which has not yet been cast, with sources suggesting Universal Pictures will not water down the erotic nature of the book.