Owner of Britain"s last Temperance Bar who extolled virtues of abstinence to TV chefs… is banned for drink driving

Owner of Britain’s last Temperance Bar who extolled virtues of abstinence to TV chefs is banned from driving… for being drunk

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UPDATED:

18:53 GMT, 30 November 2012

The owner of Britain’s last surviving temperance bar has been banned from driving for 17 months after he admitted drink driving.

Christopher James Law, 52, who owns the 120-year-old Fitzpatrick’s bar in Rawtenstall, Lancashire, pleaded guilty to the charge at Burnley Magistrates’ Court.

Temperance bars originated in Lancashire in the late 19th century. They advocated abstinence from alcohol, often asked their patrons to sign a no-booze pledge and renounce the demon drink. They were also the first outlet for Vimto in the early 20th century.

Christopher James Law, pictured at Fitzpatricks bar. Police in Burnley found Mr Law to be almost twice the legal limit when they stopped him at around 2.30am on November 7

Christopher James Law, pictured at Fitzpatrick's bar. Police in Burnley found Mr Law to be almost twice the legal limit when they stopped him at around 2.30am on November 7

The 120-year-old temperance bar in Rawtenstall, Lancashire, serves only non-alcoholic drinks like blackbeer and raisin, ginger beer, cream soda, lemon and ginger and blood tonic

The 120-year-old temperance bar in Rawtenstall, Lancashire, serves only non-alcoholic drinks like blackbeer and raisin, ginger beer, cream soda, lemon and ginger and blood tonic

Mr Law recently appeared on TV with Hairy Bikers Dave Myers and Si King, pictured, extolling the virtues of the wide range of non-alcoholic drinks he serves

Mr Law recently appeared on TV with Hairy Bikers Dave Myers and Si King, pictured, extolling the virtues of the wide range of non-alcoholic drinks he serves

Police in Burnley found Mr Law to be almost twice the legal limit when they stopped him at around 2.30am in Centenary Way, Burnley, on November 7.

HOW THE TEMPERANCE MOVEMENT STARTED

The outcry against the dangers of alcohol in Britain became loudest during the 1800s.

It was a time of unprecedented growth in an industrialising country, making the problems of drinking more evident.

Also, for the first time, affordable, alternatives to beer such as tea and pasturised milk were available.

In 1835, the British Association for the Promotion of Temperance was formed and while, at first, temperance involved a promise not to drink spirits a stronger stance soon ruled out beer and wine too.

/11/30/article-2241024-1647FD67000005DC-987_634x337.jpg” width=”634″ height=”337″ alt=”Mr Law bought Fitzpatrick's bar in Bank Street after a 20-year career as a pipe fitter. The bar has been has been selling remedies and non-alcoholic drinks such as sarsaparilla and dandelion and burdock since 1890″ class=”blkBorder” />

Mr Law bought Fitzpatrick's bar in Bank Street after a 20-year career as a pipe fitter. The bar has been has been selling remedies and non-alcoholic drinks such as sarsaparilla and dandelion and burdock since 1890

Temperance bars originated in Lancashire in the late 19th century. They advocated abstinence from alcohol, often asked their patrons to sign a no-booze pledge and renounce the demon drink

Temperance bars originated in Lancashire in the late 19th century. They advocated abstinence from alcohol, often asked their patrons to sign a no-booze pledge and renounce the demon drink

The pub attracts tourists from across the world and sells products at markets and other outlets across the area

The pub attracts tourists from across the world and sells products at markets and other outlets across the area