Real-life Ocean"s Eleven: Australian casino loses 32m after "high roller" guest colludes with staff to spy on other players


Real-life Ocean's Eleven: Australian casino loses $32m after 'high roller' guest colludes with staff to spy on other players
Large-scale sting
drawn comparisons to blockbuster Ocean's ElevenDiscovered by horrified bosses at Melbourne casino a few weeks ago Crown Casino in Melbourne says it is in a good position to recover moneyHacked into CCTV in casino and then relayed back information to player

By
Helen Lawson

PUBLISHED:

14:06 GMT, 15 March 2013

|

UPDATED:

17:31 GMT, 15 March 2013

Con artists managed to pull off a $32 million heist after hacking into a casino's security cameras.

The large-scale sting, which has
drawn comparisons to Hollywood blockbuster film Ocean's Eleven, was discovered by horrified bosses at Crown Casino in Melbourne a few weeks ago.

Detectives are trying to find out how the crime occurred, but they believe that a helper gained
remote access to the venue's security camera and were then able to tell the high roller how to bet based on other players' hands of cards.

The Crown casino in Melbourne is said to have lost $32million in a hi-tech heist

The Crown casino in Melbourne is said to have lost $32million in a hi-tech heist

they believe that a helper gained remote access to the venue's security camera and were then able to tell the high roller how to bet based on other players' hands of cards.

Bosses believe that a helper gained remote access to the venue's security camera and were then able to tell the high roller how to bet based on other players' hands of cards

The player is believed to have left Australia and returned home while a member of staff assigned to VIPs has been sacked

The player is believed to have left Australia and returned home while a member of staff assigned to VIPs has been sacked

Sources said cheating was exposed over eight hands of cards played in a short space of time, reported the Herald Sun.

The player was kicked out the hotel in the middle of the night and the VIP services manager who is believed to have been assigned to look after the high roller during his time at Crown has been sacked.

The player is believed to have left Australia and returned home after being told to leave.

Crown Casino has high-tech cameras which observe every
croupier and player in the building.

They can zoom in on gaming tables and
it is thought the high-definition lenses picked up details which helped
the high roller place the winning bets.

The
heist has been likened to the 2001 remake of Ocean's Eleven, where
George Clooney and Brad Pitt enlist a security expert, played by Don
Cheadle, to raid three Las Vegas casinos.

In
the Hollywood comedy-crime caper film the crew of conmen also relied on
infiltrating the security system at the Bellagio casino to fool the
manager Terry Benedict played by Andy Garcia.

Gamblers can play baccarat,
blackjack, roulette and pai gow at the casino's private gaming room for
VIP guests, which has restricted access and constant surveillance.

The heist has been compared to 2001 film Ocean's Eleven, starring George Clooney, left, and Brad Pitt

The heist has been compared to 2001 film Ocean's Eleven, starring George Clooney, left, and Brad Pitt

Tips: In the Hollywood comedy-crime caper film the crew of conmen also relied on infiltrating the security system at the Bellagio casino to fool the manager Terry Benedict played by Andy Garcia

Tips: In the Hollywood comedy-crime caper film the crew of conmen also relied on infiltrating the security system at the Bellagio casino to fool the manager Terry Benedict played by Andy Garcia

Gambling security consultant Barron Stringfellow told ABC local radio that accessing a casino's internal video monitoring is often 'not as hard as you would think.

'It's very easy to intercept a signal from many casinos that don't take precautions

'If casinos would monitor for wireless transmissions, they would be able to thwart these plans at the onset.'

A
spokesman told the Herald Sun that the casino believed it was 'in a
good position to recover a significant portion of the amount involved in
the scam.

'Crown has been
liaising with both the police and the Victorian Commission for Gambling
and Liquor Regulation regarding these matters.'