Risk of developing asthma doubles among children conceived after fertility treatment

Risk of developing asthma doubles among children conceived after fertility treatment
IVF children were also twice as likely to develop wheezing and up to four times more likely to have taken anti-asthma medicine by the age of fiveResearchers from Oxford University are the first to conduct a UK study of asthma after IVF conceptions
Explanations might include the severity of the infertility and the role played by treatment

|

UPDATED:

01:36 GMT, 6 December 2012

Having fertility treatment doubles the chances of a child developing asthma, say researchers.

They found children born after IVF have a twofold higher risk of wheezing and are up to four times more likely to take anti-asthmatic medicines by the age of five.

Scientists discovered the link after analysing data on 18,818 children from across the UK born between 2000 and 2002.

Children born after fertility treatment have double the risk of developing asthma, researchers claim

Higher risk after IVF: Children born after fertility treatment have double the risk of developing asthma, researchers claim

But they say the findings do not prove that asthma is triggered by IVF and any children born as a result remain at low risk.

Over 1.4 million British children have asthma and rates have shot up four-fold since the 1970s.

The causes of the disease are poorly understood, but genetic and environmental factors are thought to play roughly equal roles.

Researchers conducting the UK
Millennium Cohort Study compared children in different groups with those
born after natural planned pregnancies.

Children born to sub-fertile parents
were 39 per cent more likely to be experiencing asthma symptoms by the
age of five and 27 per cent more likely to wheeze than children born
after planned pregnancies.

But closer analysis found a stronger
link between asthma and children conceived via some form of assisted
reproduction treatment including IVF (in vitro fertilisation).

They had a risk of developing asthma
more than two-and-a-half times higher, nearly two-fold increased risk of
wheezing and more than four-fold increased risk of taking
anti-asthmatic medications.

Researchers from Oxford University (pictured) conducted the study and found that IVF children were also twice as likely to develop wheezing and up to four times more likely to have taken anti-asthma medicine by the age of five

First UK study: Researchers from Oxford University (pictured) conducted the study and found that IVF children were also twice as likely to develop wheezing and up to four times more likely to have taken anti-asthma medicine by the age of five

The risks were slightly reduced at the age of seven, according to a report in the medical journal Human Reproduction.

The researchers said their findings
should be interpreted with caution as only 104 children in the study
were born after fertility treatment.

Lead researcher Dr Claire Carson,
from Oxford University, said ‘Childhood asthma is a common condition in
the UK where the prevalence of the condition is higher than other
European countries, and to our knowledge this is the first UK study of
asthma after IVF conceptions.

‘Our analysis suggests that it is the assisted reproduction group in particular who are at higher risk.’

There could be a number of possible
explanations for the link between infertility, IVF and asthma, including
the severity of the infertility and possible role played by treatment,
say the researchers.

The scientists took account of
mothers’ asthma and smoking history, body mass index – which relates
weight to height – socio-economic status, the presence of furry
household pets and other factors previously suspected to be asthma
triggers that could have affected the findings.

In the paper they wrote: 'Children
born after ART have a much higher risk, though we cannot determine if
this is indicative of a treatment effect or related to a greater degree
of sub-fertility in this group of parents.

Research found that there was a strong link between asthma and children conceived via some form of assisted reproduction treatment including IVF (pictured)

Linked: Research found that there was a strong link between asthma and children conceived via some form of assisted reproduction treatment including IVF (pictured)

'If the observed association is
causal, then the mechanism driving it remains unknown and further
research in this area is warranted.' Dr Carson said it was important to
remember that in absolute terms the extra number of IVF children
developing asthma was small.

She said: ‘Fifteen per cent of the
children in our study had asthma at the age of five. Although this
figure was higher, 24 per cent, in the IVF children, it isn’t much
higher than the one in five risk for all children in the UK.

‘It is
also important to remember that for most children, asthma is a
manageable condition and shouldn’t prevent children from living a full
and active life.’

Malayka Rahman, research analysis and
communications officer at Asthma UK, said ‘This study suggests that
there might be an association between IVF treatment and asthma
developing in children, but the sample size for this study is small and
currently the research in this area generally is not conclusive.

‘Overall research suggests that the absolute risk of asthma increasing after IVF appears to be small.

‘Further work is needed to establish
what might be causing this association and whether there are other
factors at play other than the IVF treatment itself.

‘In the meantime those considering
IVF should speak to their GP about the benefits and health risks in
order to make an informed decision.’