Student, 21, killed by WARM AIR in a pub after stepping in from the cold night air triggers asthma attack


Student, 21, killed by WARM AIR in a pub after stepping in from the cold night air triggers asthma attackFashion student Sarah Carter-Edwards died of asthma during night outCollapsed after stepping into pub to meet friends in Market DraytonShocked father says 21-year-old was 'wise beyond her years'

|

UPDATED:

00:51 GMT, 15 December 2012

Death: Sarah Carter-Edwards was killed by an asthma attack she suffered in the pub earlier this month

Death: Sarah Carter-Edwards was killed by an asthma attack she suffered in the pub

A ‘lively and vibrant’ student died from an asthma attack triggered by the warm air in a pub.

Sarah Carter-Edwards, 21, had walked through near-freezing temperatures to meet friends for a night out when she entered the premises.

Moments later she collapsed and was left fighting for breath, despite using an inhaler.

Her friends called 999 and paramedics took her to hospital but she had gone into cardiac arrest and was pronounced dead shortly afterwards.

Her devastated father, businessman Malcolm Carter, 55, yesterday spoke of the huge ‘void’ in his life.

He said: ‘It’s a tragic loss because she’d had two little scares in the past but nothing that alerted us that this could happen. It was the cold air she breathed in and, when she got to the warmth of the pub, it seems to have triggered the asthma attack.

‘No words can do justice to her. We were exceptionally close. She was my best friend and we would do everything together.

‘She was wise beyond her years and always said and did the right thing. She was a charming, kind and compassionate young lady with a lovely nature.

‘There is a huge void in our lives and Sarah will be greatly missed by everyone.’

The heating firm owner said his daughter carried an inhaler ‘religiously’ after suffering two severe asthma attacks that required the use of a nebuliser in hospital.

Pub: Sarah succumbed to the asthma attack at the Hippodrome pub in Market Drayton, Shropshire

Pub: Sarah succumbed to the asthma attack at the Hippodrome pub in Market Drayton, Shropshire

Tragic: Sarah died soon after stepping in to the Hippodrome pub, pictured, on December 1

Tragic: Sarah died soon after stepping in to the Hippodrome pub, pictured, on December 1

A friend of the family said: ‘She was such a lively and vibrant girl. It’s hard to take in this has happened.’

Miss Carter-Edwards, a fashion student
who was taking a year out before completing her final year at
Manchester Metropolitan University, went out on December 1.

She was
meeting friends at The Hippodrome in Market Drayton, Shropshire, near
her father’s home in Tyrley.

Warning: Sarah's father Malcolm Carter, right, says he hopes other asthmatics will learn from her story

Warning: Sarah's father Malcolm Carter, right, says he hopes other asthmatics will learn from her story

Tribute: Sarah's father Malcolm, left, called her his 'best friend' who was 'wise beyond her years'

Tribute: Mr Carter, left, called his daughter his 'best friend' who was 'wise beyond her years'

Her mother Karen Edwards and sister Katie
live in Newport, Wales.

Temperatures were around 1C [33F] at
the time and the wind would have made it feel even colder. Miss
Carter-Edwards collapsed at 10.30pm and was taken to nearby Princess
Royal Hospital.

Friend Dawn Paterson wrote on
Facebook: ‘Sad to see you are no longer with us, RIP, you were an
amazing, friendly, cheerful young woman and you will be missed by
friends and family.’

Sophie Hardy said: ‘It doesn’t feel real, it never will. You had a huge effect on all of us, so many happy memories.’

Family: The 21-year-old Manchester Met student with her heartbroken mother Karen

Family: The 21-year-old Manchester Met student with her heartbroken mother Karen

Fun: Sarah pictured relaxing at a music festival; she was on a gap year at the time of her death

Fun: Sarah pictured relaxing at a music festival; she was on a gap year at the time of her death

West Mercia Police said a post-mortem
examination revealed that Miss Carter-Edwards died of natural causes.
The coroner was informed of her death but an inquest was not needed as
there were no suspicious circumstances.

Asthma UK said an average of three
people died every day from severe attacks, which can be caused by sudden
changes in temperature.

Asthma specialist Elaine Gillard said:
‘On the majority of occasions the blue inhaler – which relaxes the
muscles surrounding the airways – works very well. Unfortunately, in
some cases it doesn’t work so well and can have tragic consequences.’

1,400 DEATHS EACH YEAR

More than 5million Britons suffer from asthma, including 1.4million children, and the disease kills 1,400 people each year.

Asthma is an inflammatory disease
of the airways, causing them to constrict and resulting in attacks of
breathlessness and wheezing. Breathing cold, dry air, or humid air, and
exertion are all possible triggers.

Winter weather means drier air and
when an asthma sufferer rapidly breathes in dry air, it dries the
airway. This releases histamine that can increase inflammation of the
air passages in the lungs, leading to bronchospasm – acute narrowing of
the airway – which makes breathing difficult.

These symptoms are aggravated by extremes of temperature.

In an asthma attack the lungs
tighten, and gradually there is not enough air movement to produce
wheezing. Experts call this the ‘silent chest’ and it is a danger sign
of a severe asthma attack.

Popular: Friends of Sarah paid tribute to her on social networks such as Facebook after her tragic death

Popular: Friends of Sarah paid tribute to her on social networks such as Facebook after her tragic death

THE HIDDEN DANGER OF HOT AIR: HOW TEMPERATURE TRIGGERS ASTHMA

A sudden change in temperature puts stress on the body and is a common trigger for an attack, according to the NHS.

‘It’s been long known that in people with asthma who aren’t controlled, just swallowing cold or hot liquids can set off an asthma attack,’ says Dr Richard Gower, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

‘The temperature sets off a bronchial spasm. We know that a change in temperature, down or up, can set it off.’

Changes in temperature are also associated with more serious attacks in youngsters. A 2009 study from the University of Michigan suggested that jumps in temperature and humidity were associated with a rise in asthmatic children going to A&E.

Breathing hot or cold air can also have an irritating effect on the airway. This can cause the muscles of the air passages in the lungs to go into spasm and the linings of the airway swell making sufferers gasp for breath.

Attacks can usually be controlled by using a blue reliever inhaler and breathing slowly and deeply. However, an ambulance should be called if the attack shows no signs of easing after a few minutes.

Asthma UK recommends sufferers to take their usual dose of reliever inhaler before going out on cold, dry days. If it's cold and windy, wearing a scarf over your face will help to warm up the air before you breathe it in.

Elaine Gillard, an asthma nurse specialist from Asthma UK, told MailOnline: ‘People with asthma have airways that are very sensitive and twitchy. They can quickly go into spasm if there is a trigger, such as a change in temperature or inhaling smoke.

‘A recent survey of our users revealed 75 per cent of sufferers found cold air can trigger an attack.

‘The trick with asthma is to make sure it is controlled all the time. A preventer (brown) inhaler works to stop the airways being so sensitive in the first place. If they are triggered a blue (reliever) inhaler helps.

‘If people find they need their blue inhaler three or more times a week they should go back to their doctor to look at their brown inhaler dosage.

‘Anyone who needs advice can speak to an asthma nurse on our helpline – 0800 121 6244.'