Two travellers jailed for exploiting foreigners by making them work without pay and beating them

Family of millionaire travellers jailed for enslaving vulnerable men were handed 500,000 in legal aidTravellers housed vulnerable men in squalid conditions and exploited them They got the taxpayers' cash despite fortune from exploitation John Connors, 31, sentenced to 40 months imprisonment Brother-in-law William Connors, 35, sentenced to 30 months in prison /12/14/article-2248125-1683CA3D000005DC-436_306x706.jpg” width=”306″ height=”706″ alt=”Luxury lifestyle: William and Mary (or Breda) Connors, pictured in Dubai, lived the high life while forcing vulnerable people to obey their every command” class=”blkBorder” /> Luxury lifestyle: William and Mary (or Breda) Connors, pictured in Dubai, lived the high life while forcing vulnerable people to obey their every command A family of millionaire travellers jailed for forcing vulnerable men to work for a pittance have been given nearly 500,000 in legal aid, it emerged today. The Gloucestershire-based Connors family lived the high life at the expense of homeless drug addicts and alcoholics. William Connors, 52, wife Mary, 48, their sons, John, 29, and James, 20, and son-in-law Miles Connors, 24, were jailed in December last year after being convicted of conspiracy to require a person to perform forced or compulsory labour.

Sixty per cent of toddlers are hooked on sweets according to Vitabiotics Wellkid Baby Drops research

Parents who bribe fussy eaters are turning their children into junk food addicts by the age of three One in three parents deal with fussy eaters by bribing them with sweetsSixty per cent of parents confessed their child regularly craved sweet treats by the age of threeTwo million schoolchildren are overweight | UPDATED: 17:41 GMT, 27 December 2012 Sixty per cent of toddlers are hooked on chocolate and sweets and their parents are to blame, say experts. One in three admitted to dealing with fussy eaters by bribing them with a sweet treat, a new survey has revealed.

Like father NOT like son: Offspring of cocaine users less likely to develop habit

Like father NOT like son: Offspring of cocaine users less likely to develop habit | UPDATED: 20:15 GMT, 16 December 2012 The sons of men addicted to cocaine are actually LESS likely to develop the drug habit themselves, according to a new study. Scientists looked at the offspring of cocaine-addicted male rats and assessed what impact their father's addiction had on their own behaviour when given the Class A drug.