Sandy Hook shooting: 4 of Adam Lanza"s victims lived in a mile radius of $1.5m home killer shared with mother

Were they targeted Four of Lanza's young victims lived within one-mile radius of the $1.5 million home that the troubled killer shared with his mother Dylan Hockley's family live on the same road as the gunman Grace McDonnell's parents can see Lanza's house from their front door Jessica Rekos and Chase Kowalski also lived in the neighborhood | UPDATED: 07:46 GMT, 17 December 2012 Four of the tragic child victims of Sandy Hook Elementary School gunman Adam Lanza lived within short walking distance of the $1.5 million home the killer shared with his mother, whom he also killed. The startling measure of how close knit the community of Sandy Hook really is comes as it was revealed that one of the victims of the school massacre, six-year old Dylan Hockley, was a neighbor to the 20-year-old shooter.

Schools should axe citizenship lessons and teach more British history, say MPs as they bid to half decline in the subject

Schools should axe citizenship lessons and teach more British history, say MPs as they bid to half decline in the subject Cross-party group of MPs calling on Education Secretary to introduce measures to boost history teaching In 2010, fewer than 30 per cent of 16-year-olds at state schools did GCSE history | UPDATED: 01:47 GMT, 10 December 2012 Forgotten figure: Last year only half of English 18-24 year olds knew that Nelson led the Royal Navy to victory in the Battle of Trafalgar Schools should axe Labour’s citizenship classes and devote more time to British history studies, MPs will say today. The idea is one of a string of measures being put forward to reverse the decline in history teaching which has seen the subject all but disappear in state schools in some parts of the country. Research by the All-Party History Group found that fewer than 30 per cent of 16-year-olds in state schools were entered for the GCSE in 2010, compared with 55 per cent of pupils in grammar schools and 48 per cent in private schools.

2.3m pupils being let down by schools: Watchdog chief condemns "postcode lottery"

2.3m pupils being let down by schools: Watchdog chief condemns 'postcode lottery' | UPDATED: 01:54 GMT, 28 November 2012 Sir Michael Wilshaw, Ofsted's senior inspector, said the difference in teaching standards is 'unacceptable' More than two million children attend under-performing schools amid a ‘postcode lottery’, Ofsted’s chief inspector revealed yesterday. Sir Michael Wilshaw said there were ‘completely unacceptable’ differences in standards, even within affluent suburbs where youngsters are let down by coasting schools.