Hot temper: Expressing negative emotions can add two years to your life

Why having a hot temper is 'good for your health': Expressing negative emotions can add two years to your life Researchers at University of Jena in Germany assessed 6,000+ patientsFound that those who internalised their anxiety suffered from a raised pulseHot-tempered Italians and Spanish 'live longer than stiff-upper lip English' | UPDATED: 23:10 GMT, 25 December 2012 Hot-tempered Italians and Spanish live nearly two years longer than the ‘stiff-upper lip’ English, researchers claim.

Half of men think women exaggerate stressfulness of Christmas while a third think they could do a better job

Half of men think women exaggerate stress of Christmas while a third think they could do a better job Four in ten women would not trust their partners to carry out essential tasksA massive 85 per cent also say men don't understand the effort required for a perfect Christmas42 per cent of women find hosting Christmas Day their most stressful job of the year | UPDATED: 20:12 GMT, 16 December 2012 The festive season is generally considered to be one of the busiest and most stressful times of the year. Finding time to buy presents, cooking a Christmas dinner for the whole family and the nagging worries about how much the whole lot costs can leave some with their fair share of anxiety at this time of year.

They say they are the most family friendly government ever. So why such cowardice on internet porn?

They say they are the most family friendly government ever. So why such cowardice on internet porn | UPDATED: 22:36 GMT, 16 December 2012 One of the most pressing anxieties of responsible parents is how to stop their children from accessing pornography on the internet

Middle-class children are at risk of anxiety disorders because parents shelter them from the harsh reality of life

Middle-class children are at risk of anxiety disorders because parents shelter them from the harsh reality of life Youngsters growing up in a ‘paranoid’ culture which protects them from risk but unable to cope with life’s challenges, warns leading psychologist Professor Tanya Byron says she is treating an increasing numbers of children with anxiety disorders who lack ‘emotional resilience’ Warning comes as NHS figures reveal rising numbers of children are suffering keyboard strain, but tree-climbing injuries are plummeting By Laura Clark, Education Correspondent PUBLISHED: 15:44 GMT, 5 December 2012 | UPDATED: 15:44 GMT, 5 December 2012 Middle-class children are unable to cope with life's challenges, Professor Tanya Byron has warned Rising numbers of middle-class children are suffering mental health problems amid a trend for risk-averse parents to raise them ‘in captivity’, a leading psychologist and broadcaster has warned. Youngsters are growing up in a ‘paranoid’ culture which attempts to protect them from all risk and failure but leaves them unable to cope with life’s challenges, according to Professor Tanya Byron.

Paul Crompton: BBC editor killed himself over worries about new shift patterns following move to Salford

BBC editor killed himself after telling GP of fears over new shift patterns following move to SalfordFather-of-three was a 'model employee' but he became increasingly stressed, inquest told BBC offers its 'sincere sympathies' to his family and children | UPDATED: 10:40 GMT, 2 December 2012 A BBC editor took his own life after expressing concerns to his GP about the introduction of new shift patterns, an inquest heard. Paul Crompton was found dead in a country park a month after he began to work nights as part of changes brought in following the broadcaster’s move to MediaCityUK.