Diners order less when they know how much exercise would be needed to burn off their meal

Struggling to say no to dessert We make healthier food choices if we see how much EXERCISE it takes to burn off a meal Diners choose less calories when shown exercise needed to burn it off But knowing calories in food does not affect calories we eat at restaurants By Nick Mcdermott, Science Reporter PUBLISHED: 19:04 GMT, 23 April 2013 | UPDATED: 02:30 GMT, 24 April 2013 For those of us that struggle to say no to dessert, a reminder of the consequences might help us when we need to resist temptation. Researchers found that when diners were shown the amount of exercise needed to burn off an item of food on a menu, they chose a less calorific option. However if they were simply provided with nutritional data, they failed to opt for healthier selections.

Organic food labels "trick" us into thinking food is healthier and tastier

Organic food labels 'trick' us into thinking food is healthier and tastier Perceptions of taste, calories and value can be significantly altered when a food is labelled 'organic'Organic foods were estimated to have significantly fewer calories and taste lower in fat Customers were also willing to pay 23% more for them By Fiona Macrae PUBLISHED: 14:51 GMT, 2 April 2013 | UPDATED: 07:06 GMT, 3 April 2013 Putting an organic label on ordinary foods can trick shoppers into believing that they are healthier, taste better and have fewer calories, new research suggests. Known as the 'health halo effect', previous studies have shown that we perceive foods labelled as organic to be healthier. Now, scientists at New York’s Cornell University have found the label can influence much more than health views – perceptions of taste, calories and value can be significantly altered when a food is labelled 'organic'.

Britain"s biggest cereal brands contain 30% more sugar than same products in US

Britain's biggest cereal brands contain 30% more sugar than same products in U.S. Kellogg’s Special K has 17g per 100g compared to 13g in USCheerios have 21.5g of sugar per 100g but in America it is only 4gAlpen has 15% more sugar in UK than in the USGovernment asks companies to commit to obesity pledges By James Black PUBLISHED: 18:37 GMT, 13 January 2013 | UPDATED: 20:45 GMT, 14 January 2013 Breakfast cereals sold in Britain contain as much as 30 per cent more sugar than the same products in the United States

On a diet? Filling up on fruit and vegetables WON"T trick you into eating less

On a diet Filling up on fruit and vegetables WON'T trick you into eating lessBeing on a fruit- and vegetable-heavy diet made no long-term difference to fullness, researchers foundAdding fruit juice before meals actually boosted hunger and weight gain It goes against the theory that people should 'fill up' on lots of fruit and veg to help them feel full for longer | UPDATED: 16:24 GMT, 3 December 2012 The dieters among us are often advised to fill our plates up with fruit and vegetables at meal times to avoid gobbling down calorie laden fare later in the day.