Is DNA key to an ideal workout? Scientists say genes determine fitness and create test to identify if someone is suited to sprints or marathons

Is DNA key to an ideal workout Scientists say genes determine fitness and create test to identify if someone is suited to sprints or marathons By Fiona Macrae PUBLISHED: 00:29 GMT, 25 April 2013 | UPDATED: 06:47 GMT, 25 April 2013 If you gamely go to the gym or perpetually pound the pavements but don’t seem to be getting any fitter, the answer could lie in your genes. Scientists say DNA is key to sporting ability – and they have created a genetic test that tells someone if they are better-suited to marathons or to the 100 metres. Billed as ‘the end of workouts that don’t work’, the 249 kit reads around 20 genes involved in how the body reacts to exercise, the risk of injury and how long it takes muscles to recover from exertion

Jump in music fees charged by record companies threatens village hall dance and aerobics classes

Jump in music fees charged by record companies threatens village hall dance and aerobics classes Record companies planning hike in rates charged to amateur dance classesInstructors currently pay annual fee but will change to payment per sessionFears that community classes could be wiped out as obesity threat rises By Sean Poulter PUBLISHED: 01:55 GMT, 5 January 2013 | UPDATED: 01:59 GMT, 5 January 2013 Aerobics, fitness and Zumba classes held in village halls are under threat over plans for massive increases to the fees charged by record companies for the right to play music. Currently, instructors play a flat annual fee for a licence to play music in their classes

Schools should axe citizenship lessons and teach more British history, say MPs as they bid to half decline in the subject

Schools should axe citizenship lessons and teach more British history, say MPs as they bid to half decline in the subject Cross-party group of MPs calling on Education Secretary to introduce measures to boost history teaching In 2010, fewer than 30 per cent of 16-year-olds at state schools did GCSE history | UPDATED: 01:47 GMT, 10 December 2012 Forgotten figure: Last year only half of English 18-24 year olds knew that Nelson led the Royal Navy to victory in the Battle of Trafalgar Schools should axe Labour’s citizenship classes and devote more time to British history studies, MPs will say today. The idea is one of a string of measures being put forward to reverse the decline in history teaching which has seen the subject all but disappear in state schools in some parts of the country. Research by the All-Party History Group found that fewer than 30 per cent of 16-year-olds in state schools were entered for the GCSE in 2010, compared with 55 per cent of pupils in grammar schools and 48 per cent in private schools.