Queen Mary 2: Passengers sick with "norovirus" on Caribbean cruise

More than 200 passengers on Queen Mary 2 fall sick with vomiting and diarrhea on exclusive Christmas Cruise – as those on SECOND liner become ill with 'norovirus'As many as 190 passengers and 31 crew members have become ill with unknown illness on cruise shipSymptoms – which include vomiting and diarrhea – are consistent with norovirus, a highly contagious disease spread through contaminated food and waterTicket for similar Caribbean cruise costs upwards of $4,7000 | UPDATED: 17:03 GMT, 29 December 2012 Hundreds of passengers hoping to enjoy a pampered Christmas cruise on the imposing Queen Mary 2 are instead below deck with an unknown illness that causes vomiting and diarrhea. Earlier this week, 189 passengers and 31 crew members had come down with symptoms, which are consistent with the norovirus, a highly-contagious virus that is easily passed from person to person through contaminated food or water.

Doctors warn travellers of vaccine shortages for the potentially deadly typhoid fever

Doctors warn travellers of vaccine shortage for deadly typhoid fever Shortage follows a recall by one pharmaceutical company of 88 per cent of its typhoid vaccine stock in OctoberTyphoid fever occurs mostly in developing countries in areas with poor sanitationProves fatal in up to 30 per cent of cases if left untreated | UPDATED: 11:55 GMT, 26 December 2012 Holidaymakers escaping the British winter to exotic climes may struggle to get immunised against typhoid, doctors have warned. There is a UK shortage of the vaccine for the potentially lethal disease, following a recall by pharmaceutical company of 88 per cent of its stock.

Cold weather breakdowns could be down to diesel contamination, says AA

Cold weather breakdowns could be down to diesel contamination, says AA AA said it had received call-outs from a number of motorists complaining that their cars suddenly felt 'sluggish' soon after a fill-upThey are investigating a possible contamination of diesel fuel | UPDATED: 20:18 GMT, 7 December 2012 Motorists are breaking down in cold weather because of a possible contamination problem with some diesel fuel, says the AA. They are investigating to see how widespread the problem is – most critically whether a rogue batch of contaminated fuel is to blame or whether the problems are limited to one or more specific filling stations. The AA said it had received call-outs from a number of stricken motorists complaining that their cars suddenly felt ‘sluggish’ soon after a fill-up