Connecticut school shooting: Obama flies in to console grieving relatives and attend vigil amid calls for gun curbs

Obama flies in to console grieving relatives and attend vigil amid calls for gun curbs Met privately with families of the 26 victims and with emergency crewsCall for 'meaningful action' in wake of shootings reignited gun law debateFourth time he has visited a community still grieving from a mass shooting | UPDATED: 01:00 GMT, 17 December 2012 Barack Obama flew in last night to console grieving parents in the Sandy Hook massacre as demands grew for tighter gun controls in the United States. Mr Obama was also planning to attend an evening vigil to mourn with the shellshocked community in Newtown. He met privately with families of the 26 victims and with emergency crews who responded to the shootings before speaking at an interfaith service at the town’s high school

Parents "betrayed" on porn as ministers reject call for opt-in for online access

Parents 'betrayed' on porn as ministers reject call for opt-in for online access Ministers claim experts advised against an automatic block forcing internet users to contact their Internet Service Providers to access porn Around 35 per cent of parents backed the 'opt-in' system | UPDATED: 01:20 GMT, 16 December 2012 Deputy Labour Leader Harriet Harman says the Government is doing 'very little' about increasing numbers of children being exposed to online porn Ministers were accused of betraying parents last night after they ruled out an automatic block on internet porn to protect children.

Leveson Inquiry: Report fails to find solution to problem of online journalism and social media

MPs criticise Lord Leveson's 'strange' recipe for press regulation which offers no answers on how to control the internetInternet is 'ethical vacuum' where bloggers act with impunity, says report Highlights growth of social media – but no detailed recommendations Tory chairman of Commons culture committee says response is 'curious' Embarrassing naked images of Prince Harry and Kate used as case studiesLeveson claimed parents 'could control' what their children see onlineMail Online was singled out for its 'phenomenal growth' | UPDATED: 14:20 GMT, 30 November 2012 Lord Leveson was today criticised for his 'strange' plans to regulate the press which almost entirely ignore how millions of people get their news online. The inquiry concluded it was almost impossible to regulate the Internet – but did not make any suggestions for how it could fit with his newspaper rules. Today John Whittingdale, Tory chairman of the Commons culture committee, said it was 'curious' that the judge proposed tight controls on newspapers while doing very little to police new media.