Salt-filled sandwiches! Lunches from High Street chains have same amount as ten packets of crisps

Salt-filled sandwiches! Lunches from High Street chains have same amount as ten packets of crispsWrap from EAT contained 4.8g of salt while Pret a Manger wrap had 4.6gA 32.5g bag of Walkers Ready Salted crisps contained less than 0.5gResearchers found high salt levels in more than half of 664 tested dishesThree Pizza Hut dishes contained maximum daily allowance of 6g of saltAverage salt consumption in UK is 8.1g amid calls for suppliers to cut levels By Nick Mcdermott PUBLISHED: 23:00 GMT, 12 March 2013 | UPDATED: 23:18 GMT, 12 March 2013 Sandwiches sold by leading High Street food chains contain as much salt as ten bags of crisps, health campaigners have warned. A Peking duck wrap from EAT was found to contain 4.8g of salt, while a Swedish meatball hot wrap from Pret a Manger contained 4.6g of salt. In contrast, a 32.5g bag of Walkers Ready Salted crisps contained less than 0.5g of salt.

Walkers plans to start selling smoky bacon and roast chicken crisps containing real meat for first time

Walkers to use real meat in its smoky bacon and roast chicken crisps for first time as it bids to shake off junk food label Move to real ingredients has been greeted with horror by vegetariansWalkers tries to re-assure vegetarians that products will still be ethicalChange will now be promoted by presenter Gary Lineker next month By Francesca Infante PUBLISHED: 01:59 GMT, 28 February 2013 | UPDATED: 01:59 GMT, 28 February 2013 Vegetarians have reacted with horror to plans by Britain’s biggest crisp maker to start selling smoky bacon and roast chicken crisps that will contain meat for the first time. In what may be a surprise to many, neither of the varieties of crisps made by Walkers contain real bacon or real chicken – but instead rely on artificial flavours. The move to real ingredients is thought to be an attempt to shake off the ‘junk food’ label – but has been greeted with horror by vegetarians who have been tucking into the snacks for years

New Year? We"re staying in! Cash-strapped Brits prepare for a muted celebration on the sofa with treats and snacks

New Year We're staying in! Cash-strapped Brits prepare for a muted celebration on the sofa to welcome in 2013 | UPDATED: 08:04 GMT, 27 December 2012 Cash-strapped Britons are preparing for muted New Year's Eve celebrations with eight in ten planning a quiet night in, a survey revealed yesterday.

Mother describes horror at damage caused during her daughter"s 15th birthday party in Essex: huge crowds turned up and destroyed house after it…

Rooms trashed, graffiti on the walls and a 30k repair bill: What happens when your teenager puts their little party on FacebookEsther Hines, 56, says she was only expecting a maximum of 30 guestsShe even locked alcohol away as daughter Sarah celebrated 15th birthdayBut a crowd of around 800 teens turned up and destroyed the houseMother said: 'I feel like our entire lives has been trashed' | UPDATED: 08:50 GMT, 15 December 2012 Ruin: Esther Hines's house in Billericay, Essex, was destroyed when her 15-year-old daughter advertised a party on Facebook that quickly got out of hand Esther Hines had little reason to feel any trepidation when her daughter Sarah asked if she could host an early 15th birthday party at their five-bedroom family home. Why would she After all, it was to be a low-key, innocent affair — alcohol-free, with a maximum of 30 teenagers munching on crisps and sweets while listening to the latest chart music.

Is SALT making children fat? Youngsters left parched by crisps and chips are quenching their thirst with sugary drinks

Is SALT making children fat Youngsters left parched by crisps and chips are quenching their thirst with sugary drinks Two thirds of children consumed sugar sweetened drink in the studyIn this group the more salt they consumed the more sugary beverages they drankThe children who consumed more than one sugary drink per day were 34% more likely to be overweight | UPDATED: 18:29 GMT, 11 December 2012 Salty snacks could be fueling childhood obesity as they encourage youngsters to guzzle sweetened drinks to quench their thirst, say researchers. A study of 4,200 children in Australia found those who consumed high amounts of salt were also the most likely to reach for high-calorie beverages. This put them at risk of unhealthy weight gain, according to the research from Deakin University