Bowel cancer rates in men soar by a quarter in 35 years: Obesity, smoking and drinking to blame

Bowel cancer rates in men soar by a quarter in 35 years – and obesity, smoking and drinking are to blame But the rise among women is just 6 per cent, says Cancer Research UKThe biggest rise was seen among people in their 60s and 70sDisease is linked to factors such a lack of fibre and too much red meatSome experts also believe the link with obesity seems to be stronger in men By Jenny Hope Medical Correspondent PUBLISHED: 23:23 GMT, 1 April 2013 | UPDATED: 07:42 GMT, 2 April 2013 Bowel cancer rates among men have soared by more than a quarter in the last 35 years, new figures have revealed. But the rise among women is far lower, at around six per cent. A report from Cancer Research UK says reasons for the widening gap in disease rates between the sexes remains a mystery, although it is replicated in other countries.

Facebook: How many friends do you have? Researchers reveal what the answer could reveal about your life

How many friends do you have on Facebook Researchers reveal what the answer could say about your life Researchers say the 'perfect' number of friends caries between countriesClaim factors including the availability of friends for babysitting or even money lending can impact the number of Facebook friends a person has | UPDATED: 21:00 GMT, 17 December 2012 Some people like to have a few close friends on Facebook, while others have hundreds who they barely know. Researchers now believe that the number of friends you have can depend on how successful you are, and even how often you move.

Living near a busy road may double the risk of autism, researchers warn

Living near a busy road may double the risk of autism, researchers warn Exposure to air pollution in the womb or during the first year of life was linked to a dramatic increase chances of having the disorderChildren from homes with the highest traffic pollution levels were three times more at risk | UPDATED: 23:40 GMT, 26 November 2012 Living near a busy road could double the risk of childhood autism, warn scientists. They found exposure to air pollution in the womb or during the first year of life was linked to a dramatic increase in a child’s chances of having the disorder