Has DOG meat been found in our food? New takeaway horror after experts discover "mystery meat" in a lamb curry

Has DOG meat been found in our food New takeaway horror after experts discover 'mystery meat' in a lamb currySamples of curries and kebabs from six outlets in London were testedThe meat in a lamb curry could not be identified as common animal sourceOne burger contained no beef at all other than blood and heartBeef in another dish was found to contain chicken material including blood By Sean Poulter PUBLISHED: 19:22 GMT, 26 March 2013 | UPDATED: 19:23 GMT, 26 March 2013 A mystery meat, which has defied the best efforts of scientists to identify it, has been found in a lamb curry as part of an investigation into food fraud. The discovery raises new questions about just what is going into the nation’s takeaways and processed foods. A BBC documentary to be aired on BBC3 tonight sent samples of curries and kebabs bought from six outlets in London for laboratory tests.

Salt-filled sandwiches! Lunches from High Street chains have same amount as ten packets of crisps

Salt-filled sandwiches! Lunches from High Street chains have same amount as ten packets of crispsWrap from EAT contained 4.8g of salt while Pret a Manger wrap had 4.6gA 32.5g bag of Walkers Ready Salted crisps contained less than 0.5gResearchers found high salt levels in more than half of 664 tested dishesThree Pizza Hut dishes contained maximum daily allowance of 6g of saltAverage salt consumption in UK is 8.1g amid calls for suppliers to cut levels By Nick Mcdermott PUBLISHED: 23:00 GMT, 12 March 2013 | UPDATED: 23:18 GMT, 12 March 2013 Sandwiches sold by leading High Street food chains contain as much salt as ten bags of crisps, health campaigners have warned. A Peking duck wrap from EAT was found to contain 4.8g of salt, while a Swedish meatball hot wrap from Pret a Manger contained 4.6g of salt. In contrast, a 32.5g bag of Walkers Ready Salted crisps contained less than 0.5g of salt.

The plant skyscrapers: Giant greenhouses in city centres to herald a new age of farming

The plant skyscrapers: Giant greenhouses in city centres to herald a new age of farming The 'plantscrapers' could accommodate hundreds of storeys worth of cropsThey would use an innovate feeding system cancelling out need for soilFarms will increase crop yields because growing can occur all year round By Sean Poulter PUBLISHED: 22:30 GMT, 31 December 2012 | UPDATED: 03:00 GMT, 1 January 2013 Crops could soon be grown in greenhouses the size of skyscrapers in city centres across the country, it has been claimed. Birds Eye and other food producers are investigating building ‘plantscrapers’, which could accommodate hundreds of storeys worth of crops, in a bid to make farming more economical, sustainable and meet increasing demand

The two-year-old who is allergic to Christmas: Archie has extreme reaction to Yuletide treats

The two-year-old who is allergic to Christmas: Archie has extreme reaction to Yuletide treatsArchie Sims cannot eat mince pies, chocolate and cheeses because of a variety of allergiesNativity scenes with animals give him hay fever symptomsHis family even has to have a fake tree as pines trigger a rash | UPDATED: 00:38 GMT, 24 December 2012 Little Archie Sims is the boy who is allergic to Christmas. Not only does the two-year-old have an extreme reaction when he comes into contact with mince pies, chocolates, nuts and cheeses, but he also cannot go near all kinds of Christmas treats and yuletide items and festivities. A nativity scene poses a problem because he reacts to animals and has hay fever symptoms when the youngster, from Salisbury, Wiltshire, goes near sheep, cows and chickens.