Scientists genetically modify cows to remove their horns in health and safety bid to cut the risk of injury to farmers and other animals

Scientists genetically modify cows to remove their horns in health and safety bid to cut the risk of injury to farmers and other animals Genetically modified cow will be same as other livestock minus the hornsScientists to use sophisticated gene-editing technique to add extra DNAWill mean farmers no longer have to burn off horn buds in young animals By James Rush PUBLISHED: 00:58 GMT, 28 April 2013 | UPDATED: 01:06 GMT, 28 April 2013 DM.has('shareLink', 'shareLinks', { 'id': '2315960', 'title': 'Scientists genetically modify cows to remove their horns in health and safety bid to cut the risk of injury to farmers and other animals', 'url': 'http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2315960/Scientists-genetically-modify-cows-remove-horns-health-safety-bid-cut-risk-injury-farmers-animals.html', 'eTwitterStatus': 'Scientists%20genetically%20modify%20cows%20to%20remove%20their%20horns%20in%20health%20and%20safety%20bid%20to%20cut%20the%20risk…%20http://bit.ly/ZVYStD%20via%[email protected]' }); Scientists are genetically altering cows so they have no horns in a bid to make them safer. The genetically modified dairy cow will be identical in every way to other livestock but without the horns, in order to cut the risk of injury to farmers, walkers and other animals

Dressed in clothes for a seven-year-old teaching girls aged 12: Is 3ft tall Azad Singh the world"s smallest teacher?

My pupils call me Little Sir: 3ft tall Azad, 22, achieves his dream to be a teacher (by standing on the desk to reach the board)Azad Singh, 22, has a rare hormone disorder and stopped growing age fiveHe was bullied at school because he is just 3ft tall and weighs less than 3st By Emily Davies PUBLISHED: 00:03 GMT, 5 March 2013 | UPDATED: 04:08 GMT, 5 March 2013 At the age of 18 he was mistaken for a baby and labelled a circus freak, but 3ft tall Azad Singh has achieved his dreams of becoming a teacher – the world's smallest to be precise. Mr Singh has a rare genetic disorder which meant he stopped growing at the age of five and at the age of 22 is trapped in a child's body

Could your genes be responsible for how intensely you feel pain?

Could your genes be responsible for how intensely you feel painPeople who feel pain less intensely could have genes that work together to regulate painThose sensitive to pain are more likely to go on to develop chronic pain | UPDATED: 22:36 GMT, 20 December 2012 Sensitivity to pain is all in the genes, according to a new study. People who feel pain less intensely could have a particular set of genes that work together to regulate pain, claims a study published in the journal PLOS Genetics

Looking for a husband to give you a big family? Make sure he"s got lots of brothers

Looking for a husband to give you a big family Make sure he’s got lots of brothers | UPDATED: 00:02 GMT, 19 December 2012 If you are seeking a man who will give you a big family, first make sure you count how many brothers he has. The greater the number of male siblings your husband has, the more fertile he is likely to be, scientists say

Redhead: Four in ten Britons carry ginger genes without having red hair – and it could have major health implications

Are you a secret redhead Four in ten Britons carry ginger genes without having red hair – and it could profoundly affect our health | UPDATED: 23:27 GMT, 17 December 2012 In England, 6 per cent of people have red hair Are you a redhead, but don’t even know it Research to be released this week indicates millions of Britons carry ‘silent’ genes for redheadedness. While this does not turn their hair ginger, it may expose them to a range of increased health risks that afflict redheads, such as increased sensitivity to pain, skin cancer, Parkinson’s disease and even Tourette’s syndrome. In England, 6 per cent of people have red hair; in Scotland, the rate is estimated at 13 per cent

Why some people are gay: New study claims trait is passed from mothers to sons and from fathers to daughters

Why some people are gay: New study claims trait is passed from mothers to sons and from fathers to daughtersNew study answers puzzle of why homosexuality seems to run in familiesIt would not be expected to persist given Darwinian natural selectionResearchers show it is an epigenetic rather than a genetic trait | UPDATED: 14:26 GMT, 12 December 2012 Homosexuality is passed down through the generations from mother to son and from father to daughter, a new study claims. From an evolutionary standpoint, homosexuality is a trait that would not be expected to develop and persist in the face of Darwinian natural selection. It is nevertheless common for men and women in most cultures and previous studies have shown that homosexuality runs in families, leading most researchers to presume a genetic underpinning of sexual preference.

DNA"s double helix is pictured for the first time: Researchers hope new technique will reveal how the molecule works

DNA's double helix is pictured for the first time: Researchers hope new technique will reveal how the molecule worksResearchers have in the past used a technique called X-ray crystallography to infer the structure of the moleculeDNA encodes the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all living organisms | UPDATED: 11:18 GMT, 30 November 2012 Scientists have for the first time captured a direct image of DNA, the structure that encodes the genetic instructions of all living organisms.