Spaniards spooked by Cypriot savings grab turn to virtual currency to hide money from THEIR cash-strapped government

Spaniards spooked by Cypriot savings grab turn to virtual currency to hide money from cash-strapped governmentTrio of Bitcoin apps soar up Spanish download chartsBitcoin is a decentralised peer-to-peer currency that cuts out banksValue soars from 32 to 48 per Bitcoin in just a week 10en.pdf” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> European Central Bank report published last year warned that increased demand for Bitcoin 'could have have a negative impact on the reputation of central banks'. 'The public may perceive the incident as being caused, in part, by a central bank not doing its job properly,' the report added presciently.

Businessman "sold golf ball finding machines as bomb detection devices for thousands of dollars each"

Businessman 'sold golf ball finding machines as bomb detection devices for thousands of dollars each' James McCormick, 56, denies three counts of fraud at the Old Bailey He is accused of marketing Advanced Detection Equipment to the military and governments around the world that were little more than golf ball findersThe models sold for between $5,000 and $40,0000 each Claimed they could detect bombs from planes and underwater, court told By Becky Evans PUBLISHED: 14:11 GMT, 7 March 2013 | UPDATED: 18:27 GMT, 7 March 2013 Trial: James McCormick who is accused of marketing fake bomb detectors denies three counts of fraud at the Old Bailey A businessman sold bomb detection devices for up to $40,000 that were little more than golf ball finders, a court has heard today. 'Fantastic' claims were made about the fake detectors marketed by James McCormick, 56, but had no grounding in science and were bought for 'handsome' sums, the Old Bailey was told. McCormick’s Advanced Detection Equipment was marketed to the military, governments and police forces around the world

European Court of Justice squanders opportunity to save 14m after rejecting bid to slash sessions in Strasbourg

European Court of Justice squanders opportunity to save 14m after rejecting bid to slash sessions in Strasbourg | UPDATED: 21:25 GMT, 13 December 2012 The highest EU court has rejected a proposal to save 14million a year by reducing the number of sessions the European Parliament holds in the French city of Strasbourg. The European Court of Justice (ECJ) said the proposed change went against EU treaties and it was up to national governments, not the parliament, to make such decisions. EU treaties oblige the parliament to hold 12 plenary sessions a year in Strasbourg, 270 miles from Brussels, which is home to the European Commission, the EU executive.

It is time for Western Governments to raise their voices against Iran and regime"s human rights abuses

It is time for Western Governments to raise their voices against the Iranian regime’s human rights abuses | UPDATED: 09:51 GMT, 5 December 2012 Tragedy: Sattar Beheshti died whilst in police custody, reportedly as a result of extensive torture Iran remains front page news throughout the world, stealing headlines with their nuclear ambitions, inflammatory rhetoric and regional interference. The Iranian regime continues to be the focus of much discussion and debate, yet little attention is being paid to the internal dynamics of Iran; particularly its brutal crackdown on dissidents and its appalling human rights record. For Iranian activists on the ground, it has been a struggle to have their voices heard.