Organic food labels "trick" us into thinking food is healthier and tastier

Organic food labels 'trick' us into thinking food is healthier and tastier Perceptions of taste, calories and value can be significantly altered when a food is labelled 'organic'Organic foods were estimated to have significantly fewer calories and taste lower in fat Customers were also willing to pay 23% more for them By Fiona Macrae PUBLISHED: 14:51 GMT, 2 April 2013 | UPDATED: 07:06 GMT, 3 April 2013 Putting an organic label on ordinary foods can trick shoppers into believing that they are healthier, taste better and have fewer calories, new research suggests. Known as the 'health halo effect', previous studies have shown that we perceive foods labelled as organic to be healthier. Now, scientists at New York’s Cornell University have found the label can influence much more than health views – perceptions of taste, calories and value can be significantly altered when a food is labelled 'organic'.

Sixty per cent of toddlers are hooked on sweets according to Vitabiotics Wellkid Baby Drops research

Parents who bribe fussy eaters are turning their children into junk food addicts by the age of three One in three parents deal with fussy eaters by bribing them with sweetsSixty per cent of parents confessed their child regularly craved sweet treats by the age of threeTwo million schoolchildren are overweight | UPDATED: 17:41 GMT, 27 December 2012 Sixty per cent of toddlers are hooked on chocolate and sweets and their parents are to blame, say experts. One in three admitted to dealing with fussy eaters by bribing them with a sweet treat, a new survey has revealed.

Children who regularly eat meals with family more likely to get their five-a-day

Family meals aid five-a-day: Eating together at the table boosts children's intake of fruit and vegetables Even just Sunday lunch can help improve diet, study showsTwo-thirds of London children don't eat enough fruit and veg | UPDATED: 07:47 GMT, 20 December 2012 Eating meals together as a family – even just once a week – boosts children’s fruit and veg intake to near the recommended five-a-day, a study has found. Researchers from the University of Leeds found that even just Sunday lunch round the table can help improve the diets. The survey of 2,389 children attending 52 primary schools in London discovered nearly two-thirds of children (63 per cent) did not consume the World Health Organisation recommended amount of five portions (400g) of fruit and veg a day.

Women drinkers "pass on bad habits to their teenage children"

Women drinkers 'pass on bad habits to their teenage children' | UPDATED: 00:07 GMT, 10 December 2012 Mothers who drink heavily risk passing down their bad habits to their children, warns a think-tank. Teenagers whose mothers ‘always’ drank were nearly twice as likely to have alcohol problems in adulthood, it said. The authors added that ministers should focus more on parenting instead of minimum pricing to tackle binge drinking

More than 500,000 pensioners "will be lonely at Christmas" with just the television for company

More than 500,000 pensioners 'will be lonely at Christmas' with just the television for companyOne in six over-65s barely speaks to family, friends or neighbours once a week according to a new survey by Friends of the ElderlyThe survey reveals the depth of isolation affecting many whose well-being is at greater risk during the winter By Jenny Hope PUBLISHED: 01:28 GMT, 3 December 2012 | UPDATED: 01:29 GMT, 3 December 2012 Alone: More than 500,000 pensioners 'will be lonely at Christmas' (file picture) More than half a million older people will be spending Christmas alone this year – with only the TV for company, say campaigners. One in six is in touch with family, friends and neighbours barely once a week, while one in ten is in contact less than once a month

Formula that could predict your baby"s chances of growing into a fat child

Formula could predict your baby's chances of growing into a fat child | UPDATED: 07:45 GMT, 29 November 2012 The two-minute test predicts if a newborn baby is going to grow into an obese child At one of the happiest times of their life, it may not be what a parent wants to hear. But scientists have created a two-minute questionnaire said to predict if a newborn baby will become obese when they grow up. Six simple questions are used to calculate the risk that he or she will be dangerously overweight by the age of 16