We struggle to find right-wing comedians, admits BBC chief

We struggle to find right-wing comedians, admits BBC chief Jeremy Hardy Speaks to the Nation led to complaints from Radio 4 listenersShow criticised for 'Tory bashing' and 'prejudiced extreme left wing views' Commissioning editor Caroline Raphael has now admitted it is a struggle to find comedians with a right-wing point of view By Paul Revoir PUBLISHED: 04:08 GMT, 12 March 2013 | UPDATED: 08:31 GMT, 12 March 2013 'Diatribe': Jeremy Hardy has come under criticism from Radio 4 listeners for his 'extreme left-wing views' on his show The BBC has admitted it finds it ‘very difficult’ to find Conservative comedians to appear on radio programmes in order to provide political balance. Radio 4’s comedy boss has claimed it is a ‘struggle’ to find performers regarded as having a right-wing point of view

Even a big cat can"t resist a snowball fight! Daseep the Sumatran tiger gets her claws out in game with keepers

Even a big cat can't resist a snowball fight! Daseep the Sumatran tiger gets her claws out in game with keepers The two-year-old tried catching the snowballs with her mouth and paws She did not want to stay in her heated pen but explore her first deep snow Staff at Dudley Zoological Gardens have used sledges to transport bedding and food to its 1,300 animals after inches of snow fell in recent days By Becky Evans PUBLISHED: 19:04 GMT, 23 January 2013 | UPDATED: 09:03 GMT, 24 January 2013 She may originally hail from the tropical rainforests of Indonesia but that did not stop tigress Daseep getting stuck into a snowball fight. Instead of waiting for room service in her heated enclosure, the two-year-old Sumatran tiger wanted to explore the first deep snow she had seen. Keepers at Dudley Zoological Gardens kept her entertained by playing the unusual game of catch.

Laurel and Hardy to Strictly Come Dancing, how Christmas Day TV has changed over the past 60 years

From Laurel and Hardy to Strictly, how Christmas Day TV has changed over the past 60 years More religious content in the 1950s and light entertainment in the 1970sMore repeats, film and drama than ever before in 2012Sir Bruce Forsyth and the Queen remain the enduring figures on our screens on December 25 | UPDATED: 08:04 GMT, 21 December 2012 A church service in the morning, some Laurel and Hardy in the afternoon, then an evening in the company of Norman Wisdom before being tucked up in bed at 11pm. Christmas Day television in 1952 was a rather gentler affair than it is now – with a much bigger proportion of it devoted to religious programming. But some things, reassuringly, have endured, not least the presence of Bruce Forsyth – and the Queen.