Lord Hall: My top staff are blame-dodgers and it"s time to shake up the management, says new BBC boss

BBC's top female executive says former Director General Mark Thompson WAS made aware of Jimmy Savile sex abuse claims Helen Boaden says she told former DG about suspicions in 2011Contradicts claim that he didn't find out about abuse claims until after he left By Sam Webb PUBLISHED: 01:38 GMT, 24 February 2013 | UPDATED: 17:49 GMT, 24 February 2013 The BBC's top female executive has claimed that she told former Director-General Mark Thompson about the sexual abuse accusations surrounding disgraced TV star Jimmy Savile nine months before he left. Former director of news Helen Boaden's testimony contradicts his claim that he knew nothing of the nature of the Newsnight allegation until after he left the role to become chief executive of the New York Times. The Sunday Times reports that Boaden informed Mr Thompson about the scandal in December 2011, citing a source familiar with the situation.

Savile fall guy is back at his desk: Executive who "resigned" over report returns despite calls for him to "go now"

Savile fall guy is back at his desk: Executive who 'resigned' over report returns despite calls for him to 'go now'Stephen Mitchell still working at BBC despite resigning after Newsnight crisisOther executives have been shifted sideways into new roles Mr Mitchell will retire on a large pension next year | UPDATED: 07:57 GMT, 21 December 2012 Still there: Stephen Mitchell, who quit as deputy director of news as a result of the fallout from the Newsnight broadcast, is still doing the job The fall-guy BBC executive who ‘resigned’ after the devastating report into the Jimmy Savile fiasco was back at his desk on full pay yesterday defying calls for him to ‘go now’. Stephen Mitchell, 63, supposedly quit amid great fanfare on Wednesday after bearing the brunt of criticism in the Pollard Review which concluded the BBC had been paralysed by ‘chaos and confusion’

NHS faces privacy storm over plan to store thousands of patients" DNA to help develop life-saving treatments

NHS faces privacy storm over plan to store thousands of patients' DNA to help develop life-saving treatments | UPDATED: 07:36 GMT, 10 December 2012 The Government insists the DNA records will be stored anonymously and patients will be able to opt out if they have concerns Plans to create a database of the DNA records of thousands of Health Service patients were denounced by privacy campaigners yesterday. David Cameron, who will announce the proposal today, claims it would be a vital resource for scientists and allow them to develop life-saving treatments for cancer and other illnesses. But the campaigners warn it could lead to sensitive personal details being passed to private companies