"He was like a rag doll": Nine-year-old boy tumbled 160ft down a mountain and walked away with only a bruised leg

'He was like a rag doll': Nine-year-old boy tumbled 160ft down a mountain and walked away with only a bruised legMarwaan Rajakazee was climbing Helvellyn mountain in the Lake DistrictFather Marwaan Rajakazee was convinced his son had died during fallHe described son as 'cat with nine lives' after surviving previous accident By Daily Mail Reporter PUBLISHED: 17:29 GMT, 10 March 2013 | UPDATED: 19:01 GMT, 10 March 2013 A nine-year-old boy who tumbled 160 feet 'like a rag doll' down one of the UK's highest mountains survived with only a bumped head and a bruise on his leg. Marwaan Rajakazee had been climbing Helvellyn mountain in the Lake District with his father Imtiaz who could do nothing to stop his son plummeting after he slipped on an ice-covered slope. As Mr Rajakazee rushed down towards his son's lifeless body he was convinced he had died but, upon reaching the scene, Marwaan sat up and said 'I'm alive.' Tumble: Marwaan Rajakazee, nine, from Preston, Lancashire, was climbing Helvellyn in the Lake District with his father Imtiaz when he slipped on an ice-covered slope He described his son as a 'cat with nine lives', having previously survived an accident in which a quad bike toppled on him.

British professor discovers lost campsite from Captain Scott"s doomed Antarctic expedition 100 years after it was last used

British professor discovers Captain Scott's lost campsite eerily unchanged since doomed Antarctic expedition 100 years ago University of Cambridge Professor Clive Oppenheimer traced campsite using old mapsThe volcanologist wanted to mark the centenary of the ill-fated Antarctic mission It was last used by members of Scott's surviving base camp team | UPDATED: 16:49 GMT, 18 December 2012 A century after it was last used a lost campsite from Captain Scott's doomed Antarctic expedition has been rediscovered. Professor Clive Oppenheimer, a volcancologist at the University of Cambridge, pinpointed the remote site using original maps and photographs