Abu Qatada new landlord didn"t want terrorist tenants. And legal aid bill for fanatic is 500,000…and rising

'Just don't bring a terrorist in the house': Family's warning to estate agent who then rented home to Abu Qatada Terror preacher put up in 450,000 north London house without owner's knowledgeLandlady vows to evict 52-year-old and family, who are in property on six-month leaseCost of Qatada's legal bill said to be 'still rising' as he continues to fight deportationLast month he won his latest appeal against deportation on terror charges | UPDATED: 10:19 GMT, 17 December 2012 Hate preacher Abu Qatada has been housed in a property belonging to a family who told the rental agent they did not want it let to terrorists. The brother and sister who own the 450,000 three-bedroom house in north London were suspicious about their new tenants, but only realised who their notorious tenant was after being tipped off by journalists

Jose Luiz Datena: Brazilian news anchor negotiates live on the air with man holding his family hostage

Brazilian crime show presenter successfully negotiates live on air with knifeman holding his family hostage The suspect asked police to let him talk to TV host Jose Luiz Datena Police agreed and Mr Datena negotiated with the man for 20 minutesHe finally agreed to free his sister and mother, who he was holding hostageMr Datena said he 'regretted' being a part of the incident | UPDATED: 19:50 GMT, 1 December 2012 A Brazilian news anchor found himself in the middle of a nerve wracking hostage situation after the suspect asked to speak to him while holding his family hostage with a knife.

Leveson Report: Investigative journalists who breach data protection rules could face 2 years in jail

Investigative journalists who breach data protection rules could face two years’ jail Leveson suggests what opponents immediately described as 'chilling' changes to protections given to journalists handling 'private' informationDavid Cameron said he was 'instinctively concerned' about the plans | UPDATED: 10:16 GMT, 30 November 2012 Lord Justice Leveson suggests what opponents immediately described as 'chilling' changes to protections given to journalists who are handling 'private' information Investigative journalists who breach data protection rules could be jailed for two years under proposals in the Leveson report. The judge also suggests what opponents immediately described as ‘chilling’ changes to protections given to journalists who are handling ‘private’ information

Leveson inquiry: Judge insists officers acted with integrity over phone hacking probe

Day the police got out of jail: Lord Leveson insists officers acted with integrity over phone hacking probeOfficers had been accused of turning blind eye to phone hacking carried out by News of the World journalistsLord Justice Leveson: A ‘series of poor decisions, poorly executed’ had contributed to this idea taking holdHe accepted force’s argument it was under pressure to devote resources to thwarting terrorist attacks when original decision was taken in 2006 | UPDATED: 23:45 GMT, 29 November 2012 Police conducted themselves with 'integrity' at all times during the original phone hacking investigation, Lord Justice Leveson ruled Police conducted themselves with ‘integrity’ at all times during the original phone hacking investigation, Lord Justice Leveson ruled. In the months of fevered speculation leading up to the inquiry being called, officers had been accused of turning a blind eye to the industrial scale of the phone-hacking carried out by News of the World journalists