Abu Qatada"s presence here is reassuring, claims top Liberal Democrat

Abu Qatada's presence here is reassuring, claims top Liberal Democrat Justice Minister Lord McNally said the legal protection preventing Abu Qatada's deportation is 'part of what makes us a civilised society'Seven-year bid to deport him has cost taxpayers 500K in legal aid aloneGovernment has made a new attempt to deport the radical preacher By Jason Groves PUBLISHED: 03:38 GMT, 12 March 2013 | UPDATED: 08:14 GMT, 12 March 2013 Britain's inability to deport hate preacher Abu Qatada shows the controversial Human Rights Act is ‘working’, a senior Liberal Democrat minister has claimed. In an astonishing intervention, Justice Minister Lord McNally said the legal protection given to the man once dubbed Osama bin Laden’s right-hand man in Europe was ‘part of what makes us a civilised society’.

Shocking 62% rise in police officers being investigated for corruption

Shocking 62% rise in police officers being investigated for corruption with eight out of ten accused of illegally disclosing information Anti-corruption units are facing a workload of 245 cases every month | UPDATED: 03:10 GMT, 23 December 2012 Record numbers of police officers are being investigated for corruption, a report into police integrity has found. Anti-corruption units across the country are wrestling with a workload of 245 cases every month – a rise of 62 per cent from the year before. Most of the investigations – eight out of ten – involve officers accused of illegally disclosing information to criminals and third parties

Egypt protests: Courts in crisis as judges strike over "psychological assassination"

Egypt’s courts in crisis as judges strike over ‘psychological assassination’ and Morsi’s supporters block officials from entering courthouseProtests in Egypt over President Morsi's new degrees which extend immunity from courts to panel drafting new constitution 'It is the Egyptian judiciary’s blackest day on record,' courts said By Daily Mail Reporter PUBLISHED: 01:55 GMT, 3 December 2012 | UPDATED: 10:45 GMT, 3 December 2012 Egypt’s top court said it was suspending its work indefinitely to protest against the ‘psychological assassination’ of its judges. The declaration came after supporters of the country’s Islamist president prevented the judges from entering the courthouse yesterday. The strike is the latest turn in a crisis pitting President Mohammed Morsi and his Islamist allies against the mostly secular opposition.