Father delivers his own baby son in hotel bedroom after his wife was turned away from top hospital

First-time mother turned away from hospital because she was 'not in full labour' gives birth in nearby hotel bathroom University College Hospital midwife tells mother she was not in full labour Couple checked-in to nearby four-star Radisson Edwardian Grafton Hotel Despite repeated calls to hospital, couple advised it was 'still too early'Father Richard delivers son George Reggie Eades in hotel bathroomParamedics attended to couple and baby after the unusual labour By Shari Miller PUBLISHED: 15:28 GMT, 5 April 2013 | UPDATED: 16:03 GMT, 5 April 2013 A first-time mother gave birth to her son in a hotel bathroom aided by just her husband after the couple were turned away from a leading hospital. George Reggie Eades was born into the unusual surroundings after a midwife at University College Hospital, London, told his mother Michelle Booth that she was not in full labour and there was 'nowhere for us to go'

Laurel and Hardy to Strictly Come Dancing, how Christmas Day TV has changed over the past 60 years

From Laurel and Hardy to Strictly, how Christmas Day TV has changed over the past 60 years More religious content in the 1950s and light entertainment in the 1970sMore repeats, film and drama than ever before in 2012Sir Bruce Forsyth and the Queen remain the enduring figures on our screens on December 25 | UPDATED: 08:04 GMT, 21 December 2012 A church service in the morning, some Laurel and Hardy in the afternoon, then an evening in the company of Norman Wisdom before being tucked up in bed at 11pm. Christmas Day television in 1952 was a rather gentler affair than it is now – with a much bigger proportion of it devoted to religious programming. But some things, reassuringly, have endured, not least the presence of Bruce Forsyth – and the Queen.

Call the Midwife gives way to Downton Abbey in Christmas TV battle

Midwives give way to Downton in Christmas TV battle: Shows will no longer clash after BBC moves festive special start time | UPDATED: 12:05 GMT, 5 December 2012 It may be the season of goodwill, but when it comes to Christmas TV schedules it seems the broadcasters are determined to fight for the best slot. The BBC has been forced to move Call the Midwife festive special back to 7.30pm in a bid to avoid a clash with Downton Abbey

Downton vs the Midwife at Christmas: ITV and BBC dramas will clash in big day"s rating battle

Downton vs the Midwife at Christmas: ITV and BBC dramas will clash in big day's rating battle The two shows are due to overlap for 15 minutes on Christmas Day Call the Midwife's 75-minute festive special is due to start at 8pm, while Downton Abbey will be broadcast at 9pm | UPDATED: 01:29 GMT, 27 November 2012 Get set to press record. Two of our favourite TV shows could be battling it out on Christmas Day. At 8pm, Call the Midwife fans will settle down to watch a 75-minute festive special on BBC1

Baby boy, four, bled to death "after botched home circumcision by nurse using scissors, forceps, olive oil and no anaesthetic"

Four-week-old baby boy bled to death 'after botched home circumcision by nurse using scissors, forceps, olive oil and no anaesthetic' | UPDATED: 20:10 GMT, 26 November 2012 Grace Adeleye, pictured arriving for the trial, carried out the procedure using only a pair of scissors, forceps and olive oil A four-week-old baby bled to death after a botched home circumcision by a nurse, a court heard today. Goodluck Caubergs died the day after nurse Grace Adeleye carried out the procedure without anaesthetic and using only a pair of scissors, forceps and olive oil, Manchester Crown Court heard