Police commissioner Stephen Bett says drivers should be able to go "flat out" and speed limits should be scrapped on motorways

Let good drivers go as fast as they can and scrap speed limits on motorways, says police tsar PCC Stephen Bett said people should drive to road conditionsHe said how fast people should be allowed to drive depended on the driverHe said: 'If you've got a Formula One racing driver, well you can go flat out'Guild of Experienced Motorists has described his comments as 'nonsense' By John Stevens PUBLISHED: 17:27 GMT, 23 April 2013 | UPDATED: 07:01 GMT, 24 April 2013 Norfolk PCC Stephen Bett has been criticised for declaring speed limits should be abolished and drivers should be able to go 'flat out' on some roads Speed limits on motorways and main roads should be scrapped and skilled drivers allowed to drive as fast they like, a police and crime commissioner has said. ‘We ought to drive to road conditions rather than set limits,’ said Stephen Bett, who is paid a salary of 70,000 as the independent PCC for Norfolk

Police to put up huge fences at scenes of motorway crashes to stop rubberneckers causing traffic jams

Police to put up huge fences at scenes of motorway crashes to stop rubberneckers causing traffic jamsGovernment purchased 3,000 screens measuring two metres in heightScreens cost 2.3 million and form part of DfT's CLEAR initiativeScheme aims to improve accident clear-up times750 million cost to economy due to traffic incidents in England every year | UPDATED: 21:47 GMT, 27 December 2012 Drivers who peer across motorway lanes to observe the aftermath of crashes are to be thwarted in a bid to prevent traffic jams.

Pay-as-you-drive Britain: Ministers set to approve plans to introduce tolls on motorways and A roads

Pay-as-you-drive Britain: Ministers set to approve plans to introduce tolls on motorways and A roads | UPDATED: 13:04 GMT, 22 December 2012 Radical plans to privatise the nation’s motorways and A-roads to create new pay-as-you drive toll roads are set to be given the green light by ministers, MailOnline can reveal. The aim is to pump new private-sector money into the nation’s crumbling road network in a bid to ease the growing gridlock log-jam at a time when cash is tight and raising taxes is politically unacceptable