Thieves steal 1930s gold Nobel Peace Prize worth 150,000 from Lord Mayors house

Thieves steal 1930s gold Nobel Peace Prize in haul worth 150,000 from Lord Mayor's houseThe prize was awarded to former Foreign Secretary Arthur Henderson He was given it for his peacekeeping efforts before the Second World WarRaiders also stole a lock of hair from Admiral Lord CollingwoodThe break-in, in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, happened overnight on Monday By Steve Nolan PUBLISHED: 18:50 GMT, 3 April 2013 | UPDATED: 06:56 GMT, 4 April 2013 A Nobel Peace Prize awarded to a pioneering politician for his attempts to patch-up international relations in the years before World War Two has been stolen. The prize, awarded to former Foreign Secretary Arthur Henderson in the 1930s, was one item in a haul of items thought to be worth an estimated 150,000 to be stolen from the Lord Mayor's Mansion House, in the Jesmond area of Newcastle, Tyne and Wear. A lock of hair from Admiral Lord Collingwood, who took over control of the British fleet at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805 after Admiral Nelson was killed, was also stolen in the raid.

Brother of EastEnders actress Gemma McCluskie "was caught on CCTV with suitcase containing her body parts"

Brother of EastEnders actress Gemma McCluskie 'was caught on CCTV with suitcase containing her body parts' Tony McCluskie, 35, allegedly cut up Gemma's body with a meat cleaverHe then booked a taxi to take him and a suitcase to London's Regent's CanalHe admits killing 29-year-old actress last March 'but has no memory of it' /03/07/article-2111157-1210FEAC000005DC-254_634x319.jpg” width=”634″ height=”319″ alt=”Police at Regent's Canal in east London where the torso was found in a suitcase” class=”img-no-border” /> Cordoned off: A police officer by Regent's Canal in east London where Miss McCluskie's torso was found in a suitcase after being thrown into the water in March last year Nearly a quarter of an hour earlier CCTV footage showed McCluskie waiting for a mini cab and then struggling to get it into the boot before being driven to the canal in East London where the torso, limbs and head of his sister were dumped.

The plant skyscrapers: Giant greenhouses in city centres to herald a new age of farming

The plant skyscrapers: Giant greenhouses in city centres to herald a new age of farming The 'plantscrapers' could accommodate hundreds of storeys worth of cropsThey would use an innovate feeding system cancelling out need for soilFarms will increase crop yields because growing can occur all year round By Sean Poulter PUBLISHED: 22:30 GMT, 31 December 2012 | UPDATED: 03:00 GMT, 1 January 2013 Crops could soon be grown in greenhouses the size of skyscrapers in city centres across the country, it has been claimed. Birds Eye and other food producers are investigating building ‘plantscrapers’, which could accommodate hundreds of storeys worth of crops, in a bid to make farming more economical, sustainable and meet increasing demand