Cancer be damned! I"ll make this our best Christmas ever: The utterly inspiring story of a mother-of-six with breast cancer

Cancer be damned! I'll make this our best Christmas ever: The utterly inspiring story of a mother-of-six with breast cancer | UPDATED: 22:23 GMT, 19 December 2012 As the mother of six young children with just a few days to go until Christmas, I’m working my way through the very long list of jobs that send all of us into a spin at this time of year. There’s the hundred stocking fillers I have to buy, a mountain of presents to wrap, a super-sized turkey to source, tree-lights to untangle, Post Office queues to stand in and pine needles constantly to vacuum up. These festive duties can drive us mothers to despair, but this year I’m relishing every single task that comes my way

Family of cancer victim refused life insurance payout because he didn"t disclose PINS AND NEEDLES

Family of cancer victim refused life insurance payout because he didn't disclose PINS AND NEEDLES Nic Hughes died from cancer of the gall bladder leaving wife and young twins Insurance company Friends Life refused to honour his critical illness policySaid he had not disclosed 'reduce alcohol' advice or pins and needles painBut doctors said he drank within correct limits and pains were not relevant Friends say insurer's decision are 'morally repugnant' and started campaign | UPDATED: 21:54 GMT, 12 December 2012 The family of a man who died from cancer will not receive their insurance payout – because he didn’t declare he had pins and needles. Nic Hughes, 44, died in October after battling cancer of the gall bladder leaving his wife Susannah Hancock, 44, and twin eight-year-old son and daughter. But insurance company Friends Life have refused to honour Mr Hughes’ critical illness policy saying he did not give full disclosure of his health.

The little boy who could be killed by Christmas: Severe allergies mean Theo can"t enjoy a tree or a mince pie

The little boy who could be killed by Christmas: Severe allergies mean Theo can't enjoy a real tree or even a mince pie Both Theo and his mother suffer from a range of extreme allergies, which make celebrating Christmas a bit of a choreThey could go into anaphylactic shock if they accidentally consumed nuts or went too near a real pine tree | UPDATED: 11:31 GMT, 10 December 2012 For most children, December is an exciting time when they enjoy decorating the Christmas tree and tuck into festive goodies. But for one school boy and his mother it can be somewhat of an annual nightmare. Theo Lester, six, suffers from a range of extreme allergies, which means he can't go anywhere near a real pine tree or bite into a mince pie or Christmas pudding.