Duke of Devonshire evicts farmer whose family have worked on his estate since 1830 – because rent was a day late

Duke of Devonshire evicts farmer whose family have worked on his estate since 1830 – because rent was a day lateEdward and Elizabeth Hill served with 'notice to quit' Chatsworth House Parkinson's sufferer Mr Hill, 63, forgot to pay 2,000 in overdue rentHe immediately paid up after being served with the noticeBut the couple's tenancy was terminated by the estate anyway By Chris Brooke PUBLISHED: 22:47 GMT, 21 March 2013 | UPDATED: 22:48 GMT, 21 March 2013 Letter: The Duke of Devonshire has evicted a farmer from his Chatsworth House estate because the rent was a day late For almost two centuries his family has run a farm on the Duke of Devonshire’s famous Chatsworth estate.

Ofcom boosts efforts to trace nuisance callers as study finds numbers have DOUBLED in a year

Ofcom boosts efforts to trace nuisance callers as study finds numbers have DOUBLED in a year Three quarters of landline owners received an unwelcome marketing call in the past year – up from one in four the year before, according to telecommunications watchdog Ofcom. At the same time, almost three in four received some form of hard-sell cold call from salesmen pushing everything from compensation for accidents that never happened to home broadband. Fury: Nearly half of us have reported receiving a marketing call in the past year (file photo) Silent calls are caused by call centre computers which randomly dial thousands of numbers and should have a salesman ready to talk to anyone who picks up.

Benefits rising twice as fast as salaries: Payments to unemployed jumped by 20% in five years

Benefits rising twice as fast as salaries: Payments to unemployed jump by 20% in five yearsJobseeker's Allowance up 20 per cent from 59.15 a week in 2007/08 to 71In the same five-year period wages only rose by 12 per cent Iana Duncan Smith said the system is not fair on workers By Gerri Peev PUBLISHED: 00:01 GMT, 2 January 2013 | UPDATED: 09:49 GMT, 2 January 2013 Welfare handouts to those languishing on the dole have risen almost twice as fast as average wages over the past five years.

Cold-call champion is victorious again: Ambulance-chasing lawyers pay up for wasting his time

Cold-call champion is victorious again: Ambulance-chasing lawyers pay up for wasting his time Richard Herman has won a payout after being targeted by no-win, no-fee personal injury lawyersPreviously awarded 195 plus costs from a firm promising compensation for mis-sold PPI | UPDATED: 00:11 GMT, 22 December 2012 Invoice: Richard Herman is celebrating another victory over cold-callers A businessman who successfully sued cold- callers for wasting his time on the phone has scored another victory. Richard Herman, who won 195 plus court costs from a firm that promised compensation for mis-sold payment protection insurance, has received a payout after being targeted by no-win, no-fee personal injury lawyers. After his first win in October, Mr Herman, 53, was bombarded by phone calls from ambulance chasers promising him compensation for a road accident

Unmasked: The Indian text pest bombarding Britain with 500,000 spam messages a day

Unmasked: The Indian text pest bombarding Britain with 500,000 spam messages a day In a cafe by Euston station, tycoon brags to the Mail on Sunday of pocketing 7.50 every time you reply to his messagesBut UK law can't stop him… because he works from India | UPDATED: 22:42 GMT, 8 December 2012 This is the man who plagues half a million Britons a day with illegal spam texts telling them they are entitled to a refund for mis-sold payment protection insurance (PPI). The IT boss makes millions by selling the numbers of British mobile phone users who respond to his spam messages to claims management companies for as little as 90p each.

Banks are accused of not being as strong as they claim and hiding 60bn black hole from investors

Banks are accused of not being as strong as they claim and hiding 60bn black hole from investorsSir Mervyn King said the black hole was 'holding back our recovery'Bank of England blamed shortfall on hidden losses on loans, mis-selling scandals and 'misleading' accounting by country's biggest lendersIt ordered audit into banks' finances and called for lenders to raise funds | UPDATED: 00:11 GMT, 30 November 2012 Sir Mervyn King said banks need to raise 60billion to protect against future losses British banks are not as strong as they claim and could need to raise as much as 60billion of emergency funds to protect against future losses, the Bank of England warned yesterday. Its governor, Sir Mervyn King, said the black hole at the heart of the banking system was ‘holding back our recovery’ and must be tackled ‘head on’. The Bank blamed the shortfall on hidden losses on toxic loans, the mounting bill from mis-selling scandals, and ‘misleading’ accounting by the country’s biggest lenders – Royal Bank of Scotland, Lloyds Banking Group, Barclays and HSBC

Banks giving "misleading" details about bad debts and may have to set aside 35billion more, BoE warns

Banks giving 'misleading' details about bad debts and may have to set aside 35billion more, BoE warns | UPDATED: 14:47 GMT, 29 November 2012 Britain's banks could be 'misleading' investors by failing to account properly for bad loans, including where they have given borrowers leeway on their debts, the Bank of England has warned. The Bank of England urged lenders to take action to bolster their balance sheets and reveal the full extent of losses on bad debts, as well as expected compensation bills, in particular for mis-sold payment protection insurance (PPI). The UK's four biggest banks – HSBC, Lloyds Banking Group, Barclays and Royal Bank of Scotland – could need to increase their capital reserves by as much as 35billion between them, according to the Bank

Silencing the cold call claim sharks

Silencing the cold call claim sharks | UPDATED: 22:44 GMT, 28 November 2012 Finally! Fines were given to two businessmen who bombarded people with nuisance text messages At last! Yesterday the Information Commissioner struck a significant blow for a British public sick and tired of being endlessly bombarded by automated phone calls promising compensation for mis-sold Payment Protection Insurance. Fines worth 440,000 were levied on two unscrupulous businessman who had been text messaging people at random, saying without any justification that the recipient was entitled to a four-figure sum from their bank.