Duchess of Cambridge row: Hilary Mantel criticised for calling Kate "plastic princess" says it was taken out of context

'I have no regrets': Prize-winning author criticised for branding the Duchess of Cambridge a 'plastic princess' insists her words were taken out of context Hilary Mantel likened Duchess to a 'shop-window mannequin' in speechDavid Cameron among those to rush to Kate Middleton's defenceAcclaimed author has insisted she has 'nothing to apologise for'Mantel said context of speech was twisted to set her up as a hate figure By Kerry Mcdermott PUBLISHED: 01:57 GMT, 8 March 2013 | UPDATED: 08:56 GMT, 8 March 2013 The award-winning novelist who likened the Duchess of Cambridge to a 'shop-window mannequin' whose sole purpose is to breed has defended her comments, insisting she has 'absolutely nothing to apologise for'. Double Booker Prize winner Hilary Mantel made headlines last month when she appeared to criticise Kate as having no personality, describing her as 'gloss-varnished' with a perfect plastic smile during a lecture at the British Museum. But in an interview on BBC Radio 3’s Night Waves programme last night, she said that her words had been taken out of context, and that she had 'absolutely no regrets' about her controversial speech

Leveson Inquiry report: Cameron leads the fight for liberty

DAILY MAIL COMMENT: Cameron leads the fight for liberty | UPDATED: 10:12 GMT, 30 November 2012 Let the Mail say at once that Lord Justice Leveson, though sometimes let down by sloppy researchers, has approached his impossibly wide brief in a fine spirit of public service. To the best of his abilities, he has tried to be fair and keep his patience, while tackling issues over which passions have inevitably run high. To his credit, too, he has avowed his belief in the central importance to democracy of a free Press, accepting the former can’t exist without the latter

Leveson Report: David Cameron refuses to accept call for laws to control the Press

Cameron's stand for freedom: Defiant PM refuses to accept Leveson's call for laws to control the Press Prime Minister tells MPs idea of legal enforcement is 'complicated' and risks future politicians cracking down on the press Labour's Ed Miliband demands Lord Leveson's report be implemented in full as soon as possibleDeputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg breaks convention to give separate Commons statement to defy PM and back LevesonTory and Lib Dem leaders both oppose involving quango Ofcom in regulation and a call to impose tougher data protection rules on journalists | UPDATED: 08:20 GMT, 30 November 2012 David Cameron refused to undermine 300 years of Press freedom yesterday as he rejected the key recommendations of the Leveson Report. Minutes after Lord Justice Leveson delivered a blueprint three times the length of War and Peace condemning the 'outrageous' behaviour of newspapers, the PM made it clear he did not want any law governing their regulation.

DAILY MAIL COMMENT: Cameron leads the fight for liberty

DAILY MAIL COMMENT: Cameron leads the fight for liberty | UPDATED: 22:30 GMT, 29 November 2012 Let the Mail say at once that Lord Justice Leveson, though sometimes let down by sloppy researchers, has approached his impossibly wide brief in a fine spirit of public service. To the best of his abilities, he has tried to be fair and keep his patience, while tackling issues over which passions have inevitably run high. To his credit, too, he has avowed his belief in the central importance to democracy of a free Press, accepting the former can’t exist without the latter.

Leveson Inquiry: Doubts over "manipulated" poll that saya majority want new Press watchdog backed by law

Doubts over 'manipulated' poll that suggests majority want new Press watchdog backed by law just weeks after survey gave opposite result | UPDATED: 09:58 GMT, 29 November 2012 Questions were raised last night over the accuracy of a poll claiming the majority of people want a new Press watchdog backed by law.

Doubts over "manipulated" poll that suggests majority want new Press watchdog backed by law just weeks after survey gave opposite result

Doubts over 'manipulated' poll that suggests majority want new Press watchdog backed by law just weeks after survey gave opposite result | UPDATED: 00:12 GMT, 29 November 2012 Questions were raised last night over the accuracy of a poll claiming the majority of people want a new Press watchdog backed by law.

Salmond wants separate press regulation for Scotland, whatever Westminster chooses after Leveson Inquiry

Alex Salmond proposes separate Press regulation for Scotland regardless of Westminster’s decision over Leveson’s reportScotland's first minister wants to mirror Irish system whatever MPs chooseHe would like an independent ombudsman and a Scottish press councilLord Justice Leveson to publish report on press standards tomorrow | UPDATED: 15:13 GMT, 28 November 2012 Change: Alex has preempted the Leveson report and said he wants a different system of press regulation to the rest of the UK Scottish first minister Alex Salmond wants a separate system of press regulation to the rest of the UK irrespective of what MPs at Westminster choose to introduce after the Leveson Inquiry. The SNP leader plans to ape Ireland's model and install an independent ombudsman and a press council to deal with complaints about newspapers. Broadcasting regulation is controlled and decided by Westminster but the powers of holding the press to account was devolved to Holyrood

Cameron and Clegg split over future of the Press ahead of Lord Leveson"s report

Cameron and Clegg in unprecedented split over future of the Press ahead of Lord Leveson's report | UPDATED: 23:20 GMT, 28 November 2012 The Coalition was heading for an unprecedented split last night after David Cameron and Nick Clegg clashed over the future of Press regulation. As Lord Justice Leveson prepared to deliver his verdict today in the wake of the phone hacking scandal, the Prime Minister and his deputy were locked in talks over how to respond.