BBC forced to apologise to One Direction prize winners after "failed promise" to meet band turned into "disappointment of a…

BBC forced to apologise to One Direction prize winners after 'failed promise' to meet band turned into 'disappointment of a lifetime' Hannah Hastings and Louisa Marsden won a BBC radio competition Then spent 350 to travel to Belfast to meet One DirectionOn arrival were told there was a mistake and they wouldn't meet them The girls then found that their seats were a 'long way from the front PUBLISHED: 11:43 GMT, 21 March 2013 | UPDATED: 12:26 GMT, 21 March 2013 Two fans of One Direction experienced the 'disappointment of a lifetime' when they won a Radio 1 competition to meet the band but were told at the last minute that they wouldn't. The BBC was forced to apologise after friends Hannah Hastings, 20, and Louisa Marsden, 21, claim they were left disappointed by Radio 1.

Bestselling author Sebastian Faulks hails excitement and fun of history-writing prize

Bestselling author Sebastian Faulks hails excitement and fun of history-writing prizeBestselling author Sebastian Faulks is judging Chalke Valley History PrizeIt is run by Daily Mail and Penguin Books and challenges young writersThe novelists has berated the downgrading of history in schoolsHe said it must regain its 'central place' and is as important as science By David Wilkes PUBLISHED: 02:05 GMT, 11 March 2013 | UPDATED: 02:06 GMT, 11 March 2013 Judge: Bestselling novelist Sebastian Faulks, who is a judge in this year's Chalke Valley History Prize, wants more pupils to study history Novelist Sebastian Faulks berated the downgrading of history in schools yesterday as he urged youngsters to take up their pens and 'discover the excitement of the living past’ through writing. The bestselling author, a judge in this year’s Chalke Valley History Prize, said: 'History needs to regain its central place in schools. 'It’s every bit as important as science, maths and English

Protest over peace prize: Thousand take to the streets in Oslo to march against European Union being given prestigious Nobel award

Torch-lit protests against awarding the EU the Nobel Peace Prize ahead of ceremony tomorrow | UPDATED: 02:01 GMT, 10 December 2012 Around 1,000 protesters marched in Oslo yesterday against the awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to the European Union. Peace and human rights campaigners and members of political groups held the torch-lit protest as various EU leaders arrived in Norway, where they will collect the award today. The protesters argued the EU is undemocratic and maintains a large military even as it suffers an economic downturn