Spine zapper "fixes" backs

Spine zapper 'fixes' backs: New device using high-frequency electrical pulse to revolutionise back pain treatmentSpinal cord stimulator sends electrical pulses through the spineNevro is 200 times more powerful than current stimulators | UPDATED: 22:30 GMT, 29 December 2012 A new device that sends a high-frequency electrical pulse through the spine could revolutionise the treatment of severe back pain, according to a new study. A team at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital, London, is the first in the world to implant the Nevro spinal cord stimulator in 100 patients who would otherwise need surgery to stop their back pain. The device is less invasive than surgery and cheaper.

We"re a nation of painkiller addicts: Doctors writing 62m prescriptions every year

We're a nation of painkiller addicts: Doctors writing 62million prescriptions every yearExperts say doctors give out pills too readily, often just signing forms without checking detailsSix billion pills were bought over the counter last year, with sales growing at 4.1 per cent annually | UPDATED: 09:10 GMT, 28 December 2012 More than 62million prescriptions are written annually on the NHS, a 30 per cent rise in only five years Britain has become a nation of painkiller addicts, with soaring numbers of pills handed out by GPs.

Could your genes be responsible for how intensely you feel pain?

Could your genes be responsible for how intensely you feel painPeople who feel pain less intensely could have genes that work together to regulate painThose sensitive to pain are more likely to go on to develop chronic pain | UPDATED: 22:36 GMT, 20 December 2012 Sensitivity to pain is all in the genes, according to a new study. People who feel pain less intensely could have a particular set of genes that work together to regulate pain, claims a study published in the journal PLOS Genetics

Heathrow Airport resumes normal service today after ice and freezing fog saw almost 200 flights cancelled

Normal service resumes at Heathrow after ice and freezing fog saw almost 200 flights cancelled Heathrow Airport said no flights have been cancelled today following disruption caused by freezing fog yesterday 98 arrivals and 91 departures were called off at Britain's biggest airport Parts of Scotland reached -10C closely followed by Chesham, Buckinghamshire, at -9C and Little Rissington in Gloucestershire at -8CRush-hour commuters faced chaos on major roads including the A1(M) as well as the main line rail and Tube Spate of accidents on roads, including overturned car and another which crashed into house | UPDATED: 09:57 GMT, 13 December 2012 Normal service has resumed at Heathrow this morning after ice and freezing fog forced it to cancel 189 flights to and from the airport yesterday. Hundreds of passengers were thought to have been left stranded both here and abroad after the airport called off 98 arrivals and 91 departures scheduled throughout the day.

Autumn Statement: Pensions raid will hit 340,000 high earners

Pensions raid will hit 340,000 high earners: Public sector fat cats among those targeted in the 1bn tax grab Pension tax-breaks to be cut to from 50,000 to 40,000 a year to raise 1bnChancellor insists wealthy must shoulder more of Britain's debt burdenTax-free allowance for pensions cut from 1.5m to 1.25m over a lifetimeExperts say cuts will not just hit fat cats and will discourage savers But basic state pension is to rise by 2.5% next year to 110.15 a weekCritics say that it still leaves one in five pensioners in poverty | UPDATED: 01:55 GMT, 6 December 2012 A 1billion raid on pensions will hit tens of thousands of middle and high-income earners, experts warned last night. George Osborne yesterday announced he was cutting the tax-free amount an individual can put into their pension each year from 50,000 to 40,000. It comes just a year after the annual limit was cut from 255,000

Brave school girl, 4, takes chemotherapy drugs to battle painful ARTHRITIS she has had since she was two

Brave school girl, 4, takes chemotherapy drugs to battle painful ARTHRITIS she has had since she was two Lily has chronic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, which affects one in 10,000 children aged 16 or underShe takes chemotherapy drugs as this stops the immune system from attacking the jointsHowever, they cause unpleasant side-effects including vomiting | UPDATED: 12:15 GMT, 30 November 2012 When Lily Aird went from being an active toddler to one that could barely walk within the space of weeks, her mother knew that something was seriously wrong. Claire rushed her two-year-old to the doctor and after months of testing and treatment was shocked to be told her daughter had arthritis.