Diners order less when they know how much exercise would be needed to burn off their meal

Struggling to say no to dessert We make healthier food choices if we see how much EXERCISE it takes to burn off a meal Diners choose less calories when shown exercise needed to burn it off But knowing calories in food does not affect calories we eat at restaurants By Nick Mcdermott, Science Reporter PUBLISHED: 19:04 GMT, 23 April 2013 | UPDATED: 02:30 GMT, 24 April 2013 For those of us that struggle to say no to dessert, a reminder of the consequences might help us when we need to resist temptation. Researchers found that when diners were shown the amount of exercise needed to burn off an item of food on a menu, they chose a less calorific option. However if they were simply provided with nutritional data, they failed to opt for healthier selections.

"There are no chemical leaks out of control" Texas police play down fears of ammonium air leak following fertilizer plant blast

'There are no chemical leaks out of control': Texas police play down fears of ammonium air leak following fertilizer plant blast Toxic fumes from the blaze are 'under control' according to police chief Patrick Swanton Blast is thought to have been caused by the ignition of dangerous anhydrous ammonia at the plantIf gas is inhaled it can cause eye irritation and damage the lungs By Michael Zennie, Anna Edwards and Katie Davies PUBLISHED: 04:35 GMT, 18 April 2013 | UPDATED: 18:44 GMT, 18 April 2013 Emergency workers have played down fears of a toxic air leak following the fertilizer plant explosion in West, Texas. Initially reports suggested the farming community would be under a secondary danger of inhaling ammonia fumes which can cause respiratory problems

Amazing FOUR BILLION-PIXEL interactive panorama gives you a 360-degree view of Mars as if standing next to Curiosity rover

The picture that makes you feel as if you're on Mars: FOUR BILLION pixel interactive panorama gives you a 360-degree view as if you're standing next to the Curiosity rover Photographer Andrew Bodrov used 407 pictures from two Curiosity cameras to make the interactive image By Helen Lawson PUBLISHED: 20:32 GMT, 30 March 2013 | UPDATED: 08:10 GMT, 31 March 2013 Ever wondered what it would be like to gaze across the surface of Mars Thanks to one photographer, you can – with only a click of the mouse. Andrew Bodrov spent two weeks creating the interactive image using 407 pictures from the narrow angle and medium angle cameras on the head of Nasa's Curiosity rover and a bit of digital retouching. '[The camera] is only two megapixels, which by today's standards is not huge,' he told Popular Science.

75,000 cap on cost of care will lost thousands of pensioners their homes

75,000 cap on cost of care will lose thousands of pensioners their homes By Daniel Martin PUBLISHED: 01:55 GMT, 9 February 2013 | UPDATED: 07:02 GMT, 9 February 2013 Criticised: Lord Warner warned that setting the cost of long-term care cap so high could mean thousands of pensioners will have to sell their homes A chief architect of plans to limit the cost of long-term care has criticised ministers for setting the cap so high that thousands of pensioners will have to sell their homes. Lord Warner is warning that if a husband and wife both move into care, they could have to pay 150,000 before the state steps in – wiping out almost the entire value of an average house

Teachers shouldn"t use red coloured pens to mark homework "because it"s like shouting and upsets pupils"

Teachers shouldn't use red coloured pens to mark homework 'because it's like shouting and upsets pupils' Students think they are being marked more harshly if it's written in redTeachers should use more neutral colours like blue, say researchers at University of Colorado in the U.S'I think it's a rather silly idea,' chairman of Campaign for Real Education By Steve Robson PUBLISHED: 13:13 GMT, 17 January 2013 | UPDATED: 16:05 GMT, 17 January 2013 Researchers at the University of Colorado found students think they have been marked more harshly if it is written in red ink Teachers should stop using red pens to mark homework and tests because it could upset schoolchildren, U.S researchers say. A study showed students think they've been assessed more harshly when their work is covered in red ink compared to more neutral colours like blue. Sociologists Richard Dukes and Heather Albanesi from the University of Colorado told the Journal of Social Science: 'The red grading pen can upset students and weaken teacher-student relations and perhaps learning.' In 2008, hundreds of schools banned teachers from using red ink to correct work because they considered it 'confrontational' and 'threatening'

School that spent 500,000 giving its pupils iPads admits that HALF are now broken

School that spent 500,000 giving its pupils iPads admits that HALF are now broken Honywood Community Science School gave iPad2 to its 1,200 pupils a year agoAdmits half of the costly devices have been broken By Hannah Roberts PUBLISHED: 00:42 GMT, 1 January 2013 | UPDATED: 00:58 GMT, 1 January 2013 A school which gave out iPads to every pupil in hope of improving their education has admitted that just a year later half the costly devices have been broken. Honywood Community Science School dished out iPad2 tablets to its 1,200 pupils a year ago, at vast cost to the taxpayer.

Perfect parties… on a plate: How cutlery and crockery are just as important as food in making the perfect meal

Perfect parties… on a plate: How cutlery and crockery are just as important as food in making the perfect meal New study shows food tastes different depending on what plate its onProfessor Charles Spence advised those planning a dinner party to spend as much time on the table setting as the food By Fiona Macrae Science Correspondent PUBLISHED: 01:59 GMT, 1 January 2013 | UPDATED: 01:59 GMT, 1 January 2013 If your dinner parties always go a little awry, don’t blame the cooking – it might be the plates.

Neon Roberts: Uncle in plea to sister who STILL can"t accept brain-tumour boy needs vital radiotherapy

Put your son before your beliefs: Neon's uncle in plea to sister who STILL can't accept brain-tumour boy needs vital radiotherapy | UPDATED: 11:24 GMT, 23 December 2012 Fighting on: Sally Roberts, the mother of Neon The uncle of seven-year-old Neon Roberts – the boy whose mother Sally has fought a court battle to stop doctors using radiotherapy to treat his brain tumour – has urged her to put her beliefs aside to save her son’s life. And Tony Leese revealed Mrs Roberts’s quest to find ‘alternative’ cures for her son was in part prompted by a doctor’s careless comment that radiotherapy would ‘fry’ her son’s brain. The highly emotive case has pitched Mrs Roberts’s maternal love and instincts against medical science and last week a judge ruled it was the doctors, rather than the mother, who had his best interests at heart

Put your son before your beliefs: Neon"s uncle in plea to sister who STILL can"t accept brain-tumour boy needs vital radiotherapy

Put your son before your beliefs: Neon's uncle in plea to sister who STILL can't accept brain-tumour boy needs vital radiotherapy | UPDATED: 23:17 GMT, 22 December 2012 Fighting on: Sally Roberts, the mother of Neon The uncle of seven-year-old Neon Roberts – the boy whose mother Sally has fought a court battle to stop doctors using radiotherapy to treat his brain tumour – has urged her to put her beliefs aside to save her son’s life. And Tony Leese revealed Mrs Roberts’s quest to find ‘alternative’ cures for her son was in part prompted by a doctor’s careless comment that radiotherapy would ‘fry’ her son’s brain