Forget the cologne and witty one-liners, it"s all about how men speak that attracts women

Forget the cologne and witty one-liners, it's all about how men speak that attracts womenMost desirable male voice for British women is 'deep, rumbling and breathy' Different vocal traits are associated with size, attractiveness, friendliness By Nick Mcdermott PUBLISHED: 21:52 GMT, 24 April 2013 | UPDATED: 06:47 GMT, 25 April 2013 Chaps, forget the expensive cologne and witty one-liners, the way to a woman's heart could be as simple as lowering your voice. Scientists have found different vocal traits are instinctively associated with body size, attractiveness and friendliness

Organic food labels "trick" us into thinking food is healthier and tastier

Organic food labels 'trick' us into thinking food is healthier and tastier Perceptions of taste, calories and value can be significantly altered when a food is labelled 'organic'Organic foods were estimated to have significantly fewer calories and taste lower in fat Customers were also willing to pay 23% more for them By Fiona Macrae PUBLISHED: 14:51 GMT, 2 April 2013 | UPDATED: 07:06 GMT, 3 April 2013 Putting an organic label on ordinary foods can trick shoppers into believing that they are healthier, taste better and have fewer calories, new research suggests. Known as the 'health halo effect', previous studies have shown that we perceive foods labelled as organic to be healthier. Now, scientists at New York’s Cornell University have found the label can influence much more than health views – perceptions of taste, calories and value can be significantly altered when a food is labelled 'organic'.

Cameron and Miliband really are on a different wavelength: People at different ends of political spectrum "use their brains differently"

Ed and Dave really are on a different wavelength: People at opposite ends of political spectrum 'use their brains differently'New study says while parental influence may play a role, being a Tory or a socialist changes how the brain functions The results suggest that liberals and conservatives engage in different cognitive processes when they think about risk By Daily Mail Reporter PUBLISHED: 01:49 GMT, 14 February 2013 | UPDATED: 04:20 GMT, 14 February 2013 People at opposite ends of the political spectrum don't just have different views – they even use their brains differently. Researchers have found liberals and conservatives use different parts of the brain when they make risky decisions and these regions can be used to predict which political party a person prefers. The new study by a team of political scientists and neuroscientists suggests that while genetics or parental influence may play a significant role, being a Tory or a socialist changes how the brain functions

Richard III: Woman feels chill in Leicester car park where human remains found

'I absolutely knew I was walking on his grave': Woman feels a chill in car park where human remains found thought to be Richard IIILeicester University scientists expected to confirm remains are Richard III'sConducted a range of tests including carbon-dating and a DNA match with a descendent of the Plantagenet King's sisterPhilippa Langley who initially funded excavation said she was '99% sure' A documentary will also be screened on Channel 4 charting the excavation and subsequent testing /12/15/article-2248448-1685748A000005DC-527_306x555.jpg” width=”306″ height=”555″ alt=”Confirmation: The human remains found under a car park in Leicester are expected to be confirmed as belonging to Richard III ” class=”blkBorder” /> Confirmation: The human remains found under a car park in Leicester are expected to be confirmed as belonging to Richard III A skeleton thought to be Richard III, discovered underneath a car park in Leicester, was found after a women had a hunch that he was buried there. Screenwriter Philippa Langley said she felt a chill on a hot summer's day as she walked through the area where it was thought he was buried.

Face to face, Sir David Attenborough and the pink iguana in new series on Galapagos Islands

Face to face, Sir David and the pink iguana as Attenborough reveals lizard even Darwin missed in new series on Galapagos IslandsSir David Attenborough examines the iguana in his new series Galapagos 3DThe lizard is so rare it wasn't documented by science until 2009Islands which were beloved by Charles Darwin are famous for unique wildlife /12/31/article-0-16B3E7F1000005DC-241_306x423.jpg” width=”306″ height=”423″ alt=”Close up: Sir David Attenborough reveals the secrets of the rare pink iguana for the first time on screen from its home in the Galapagos Islands” class=”blkBorder” /> Close up: Sir David Attenborough reveals the secrets of the rare pink iguana for the first time on screen from its home in the Galapagos Islands At his age, David Attenborough thought he’d seen most things – but his extraordinary career still holds surprises. For the first time on screen, the veteran broadcaster reveals the secrets of the very rare pink iguana from its remote home on the Galapagos Islands

Forget Skippy: Wallaby and Dingo, the radio telescopes in the Australian outback set to discover 700,000 new galaxies in 2013

Australian scientists unveil Wallaby and Dingo, the radio telescope network in the outback they hope could discover 700,000 new galaxies in 2013 The two new sky surveys will use data from an array of 36 antennas each 12 meters (40 feet) acrossProject is also the first building block in the world's largest telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) which will be based in both Australia and South Africa | UPDATED: 02:08 GMT, 1 January 2013 Two Australian sky surveys named Wallaby and Dingo are expected to discover 700,000 galaxies over the course of the new year.

How that extra mince pie or tot of brandy could take years off your life

How that extra mince pie or tot of brandy could take years off your life Smoking, eating red meat and watching TV can each knock at least 30 minutes off your life expectancy for every day you indulgeBut you could claw back time by sticking to just one alcoholic drink and eating plenty of fruit and veg | UPDATED: 23:30 GMT, 17 December 2012 Every over-indulgence can reduce your life expectancy by at least half an hour, say Cambridge scientists Having that extra mince pie, seconds of roast turkey or an extra tipple takes hours off your life, new research suggests.

Why some people are gay: New study claims trait is passed from mothers to sons and from fathers to daughters

Why some people are gay: New study claims trait is passed from mothers to sons and from fathers to daughtersNew study answers puzzle of why homosexuality seems to run in familiesIt would not be expected to persist given Darwinian natural selectionResearchers show it is an epigenetic rather than a genetic trait | UPDATED: 14:26 GMT, 12 December 2012 Homosexuality is passed down through the generations from mother to son and from father to daughter, a new study claims. From an evolutionary standpoint, homosexuality is a trait that would not be expected to develop and persist in the face of Darwinian natural selection. It is nevertheless common for men and women in most cultures and previous studies have shown that homosexuality runs in families, leading most researchers to presume a genetic underpinning of sexual preference.

Treat them mean, keep them keen is the secret for holding on to a man, scientists say

Treat them mean, keep them keen: Playing hard to get really is the secret for winning a partner, scientists say Men and women play hard to get to test their loved one's commitment Report from researchers at the University of Western Sydney and Singapore Management University found 59 different ways both genders manipulate their partners Sarcasm, withholding sex and flirting with others among top tactics used | UPDATED: 08:27 GMT, 10 December 2012 Treat 'em mean: Researchers say there are evolutionary reasons why we are standoffish to loved ones For generations, suitors have suspected that playing hard to get is a feminine wile dreamt up solely to try their patience. It seems, however, that there are sound evolutionary reasons why treating a man mean is the best way to keep him keen.

Pioneering breast cancer treatment turns tumours into a ball of ice which kills harmful tissue

Pioneering breast cancer treatment freezes tumours into a ball of ice which kills harmful tissue Needle cooled to -170C with liquid nitrogen repeatedly inserted into cancerous tissue Device turns cancerous tumour into 'ball of ice' Technique developed by Israel-based firm could be completed in 15 minutes without need for surgeryCryoablation could one day be used to treat kidney, prostate and liver cancer | UPDATED: 12:30 GMT, 9 December 2012 Surgery may soon be a thing of the past for breast cancer patients, thanks to a new technique that destroys tumours by freezing them.