Fears over internet freedom as world"s nations gather at crucial UN conference on web regulation to discuss 900 potential laws

Fears over internet freedom as world's nations gather at crucial UN conference on web regulation to discuss 900 potential lawsSome nations, including Russia, call for laws to allow state censorshipOther countries, including America, call for internet freedomNearly 200 countries will give their position on the state of the internetFirst major look at the rules since 1988 – a decade before the web went mainstream | UPDATED: 13:47 GMT, 3 December 2012 The battle over web freedom and controls is set to take place over the next 11 days, with 193 countries gathering to discuss the future of internet regulation. When the United Nations delegates last met to discuss the laws of the virtual land, it was 1988, and the Internet was pretty much unheard of within the general public. At that time, Google was still a twinkle in the eyes of two 15-year-olds, auctions could only be won if you attended in person, and Amazon was a river in South America

Paul Crompton: BBC editor killed himself over worries about new shift patterns following move to Salford

BBC editor killed himself after telling GP of fears over new shift patterns following move to SalfordFather-of-three was a 'model employee' but he became increasingly stressed, inquest told BBC offers its 'sincere sympathies' to his family and children | UPDATED: 10:40 GMT, 2 December 2012 A BBC editor took his own life after expressing concerns to his GP about the introduction of new shift patterns, an inquest heard. Paul Crompton was found dead in a country park a month after he began to work nights as part of changes brought in following the broadcaster’s move to MediaCityUK.