Forget the cologne and witty one-liners, it"s all about how men speak that attracts women

Forget the cologne and witty one-liners, it's all about how men speak that attracts womenMost desirable male voice for British women is 'deep, rumbling and breathy' Different vocal traits are associated with size, attractiveness, friendliness By Nick Mcdermott PUBLISHED: 21:52 GMT, 24 April 2013 | UPDATED: 06:47 GMT, 25 April 2013 Chaps, forget the expensive cologne and witty one-liners, the way to a woman's heart could be as simple as lowering your voice. Scientists have found different vocal traits are instinctively associated with body size, attractiveness and friendliness

Another thing Thatcher was right about: People even prefer leaders in feminine roles to have a deep voice, new research shows

Another thing Thatcher was right about: People even prefer leaders in feminine roles to have a deep voice, new research showsFormer PM had lessons to lower her voice to make it sound authoritative | UPDATED: 22:03 GMT, 12 December 2012 Elocution lessons: Former prime minister Margaret Thatcher was taught to speak in a lower pitch, and now research shows she was right Even women prefer leaders in typically female roles to have a Thatcheresque deep voice, research has shown. Former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher famously had elocution lessons to lower her voice and make it sound more masculine and authoritative. She was advised – correctly, in light of subsequent research – that members of the public would find this more appealing.

BBC is full of overpaid penpushers says Patten: And we need to do more to tackle problem, he admits

BBC is full of overpaid penpushers says Patten: And we need to do more to tackle problem, he admits Lord Patten announced he wants to stay on as chairman of BBC TrustHe battered away suggestions that he didn't give BBC enough attention because of his 10 jobs, saying he worked more than his contract stipulates Entwistle seen entering solicitors' office where Pollard Review conducted | UPDATED: 02:00 GMT, 27 November 2012 BBC chairman Lord Patten yesterday admitted the corporation was ‘over-managed’ by a vast number of highly paid, jargon-spouting bureaucrats. And despite overseeing a shambolic period encompassing the Lord McAlpine scandal and subsequent departure of director general George Entwistle, Lord Patten hinted he would consider another term in his 110,000-a-year part-time role – which he described as ‘exciting’