Now chief of free information Christopher Graham calls for secret arrests

Now chief of free information Christopher Graham calls for secret arrests Information Commissioner said there was no ‘pressing social need’ for the public to be told who was being held by the policeSuch anonymity has been branded an attack on open justice By Martin Beckford PUBLISHED: 01:06 GMT, 14 April 2013 | UPDATED: 13:21 GMT, 14 April 2013 The row over secret arrests deepened last night as Britain’s data watchdog claimed that naming crime suspects breaches their human rights. Christopher Graham, the Information Commissioner, said there was no ‘pressing social need’ for the public to be told who was being held by the police

Google facing legal action in EVERY EU country over "data goldmine" collected about users

Google facing fines in EVERY EU country as Information Commissioner launches probe into search giant's privacy policy Possibility of imposing fines or restrictions on operations across the entire 27-country European UnionBritain's Information commissioner launches formal investigation Comes as Google's privacy director, Alma Whitten, steps down PUBLISHED: 14:56 GMT, 2 April 2013 | UPDATED: 15:25 GMT, 2 April 2013 Google is facing legal action across Europe as regulators try and force the company to overhaul practices they say let it create a data goldmine at the expense of unwitting users. Led by the French, organizations in Britain, the Netherlands, Germany, Spain and Italy agreed today on the joint action, with the ultimate possibility of imposing fines or restrictions on operations across the entire 27-country European Union. Last year the company merged 60 separate privacy policies from around the world into one universal procedure

Ten "potentially dangerous" terror suspects including pair linked to liquid bomb plot "will be free by the end of the year"

Ten 'potentially dangerous' terror suspects including pair linked to liquid bomb plot 'will be free by the end of the year' Terrorism suspects used to held under renewable control ordersNow orders known as Tpims have a two-year maximumThe new orders can be extended only if there is fresh evidence Ten potentially dangerous individuals will be free from next year . Labelled control orders ‘Light’ they were in some critical aspects weaker than the orders they replaced. As well as being time limited, they could not be used to remove individuals from their homes and send them to different parts of the country

Drug that prevents breast cancer for 20 years: Protection for thousands at high risk

Drug that prevents breast cancer for 20 years: Protection for thousands at high risk New guidelines suggest tamoxifen or raloxifene could offer up to 20 years of protection for those considered at high risk of cancerWomen would take the drugs for five years either before or after the menopause, with the aim of slashing odds of developing the disease By Jenny Hope PUBLISHED: 00:00 GMT, 15 January 2013 | UPDATED: 02:18 GMT, 15 January 2013 Thousands of healthy women could be offered powerful breast cancer drugs to cut their chances of contracting the disease. New guidelines suggest the drugs tamoxifen or raloxifene could offer as much as 20 years of protection for those considered at high risk of cancer

Ofcom boosts efforts to trace nuisance callers as study finds numbers have DOUBLED in a year

Ofcom boosts efforts to trace nuisance callers as study finds numbers have DOUBLED in a year Three quarters of landline owners received an unwelcome marketing call in the past year – up from one in four the year before, according to telecommunications watchdog Ofcom. At the same time, almost three in four received some form of hard-sell cold call from salesmen pushing everything from compensation for accidents that never happened to home broadband. Fury: Nearly half of us have reported receiving a marketing call in the past year (file photo) Silent calls are caused by call centre computers which randomly dial thousands of numbers and should have a salesman ready to talk to anyone who picks up.

Almost 200 BBC executives given pay-offs of more than 100,000 EACH in just three years

BBC to be investigated by watchdog over revelations that 200 executives received pay-offs of 100,000 EACH in just three years A total of 14 senior managers pocketed more than 300,000 eachHighest individual payment was 949,000 to Mark Byford MPs said losing a well-paid job at BBC is like 'winning the lottery' By Simon Cable PUBLISHED: 05:04 GMT, 26 December 2012 | UPDATED: 01:13 GMT, 27 December 2012 The BBC is to be investigated by the National Audit Office after it emerged that almost 200 of the corporation’s managers have been handed payoffs of 100,000 each in the past three years. The watchdog is to examine the scale of severance packages in the New Year after MPs recently claimed that losing a job at the BBC was like ‘winning the lottery’. The move comes after it was revealed that the BBC’s former Director General, George Entwistle, received a 450,000 exit package when he left the job last month – double what he was entitled to

Parents who volunteer for flower arranging should not get an advantage for oversubscribed church school places, watchdog warns

Parents who volunteer for flower arranging should not get an advantage for oversubscribed church school places, watchdog warns | UPDATED: 19:09 GMT, 21 December 2012 Middle-class parents who volunteer at schools and churches to help get their children into a good school should not be given favourable treatment, the schools adjudicator has said. The warning comes after a top Roman Catholic school attended by Tony Blair’s eldest children was found to have breached admissions rules by favouring parents who helped out at church. The London Oratory School in Fulham, south west London, was giving priority to applications from families involved in flower arranging, Bible readings and singing in the church choir.

Lloyds TSB bans staff from selling bank accounts with monthly fees "after fears they were mis-sold"

Lloyds TSB bans staff from selling bank accounts with monthly fees 'after fears they were mis-sold to customers' | UPDATED: 02:04 GMT, 20 December 2012 Britain’s biggest bank Lloyds TSB is to stop providing lucrative paid-for current accounts following a crackdown by the City watchdog. Branch managers were told yesterday they would have to temporarily pull the plug on sales of packaged accounts which cost up to customers 300 a year. These deals are a rich source of profit for banks

Miscarriage conveyor belt: Women in depths of despair are treated heartlessly by NHS staff, says watchdog

Miscarriage conveyor belt: Women in depths of despair are treated heartlessly by NHS staff, says watchdog A report by Nice says that patients who have lost their baby are often dealt with by 'insensitive' doctors, nurses and receptionistsMany are left to wait on wards where they can hear others giving birth, according to the report | UPDATED: 23:17 GMT, 11 December 2012 Distress: Women who suffer miscarriages are often dealt with by 'insensitive' doctors, nurses and receptionists, according to a new report Women who suffer miscarriages are being treated in a heartless ‘conveyor belt’ system, according to the NHS watchdog. Its report says patients who have lost their baby are often dealt with by ‘insensitive’ doctors, nurses and receptionists

How much will your annual rail fare be next year? Rail firms reveal full extent of huge increases faced by commuters

How much will your annual rail fare be next year Rail firms reveal full extent of huge increases faced by commuters From New Year onwards passengers will face fare rises of up to 10 per centHike on average will be 3.9 per cent according to figures released todayRail companies accused of trying to 'bury bad news' as they sneaked out the details of fare rises under cover of Virgin franchise fiasco | UPDATED: 02:06 GMT, 7 December 2012 Rail firms were accused last night of trying to ‘bury bad news’ by releasing details of big fare rises under cover of the Virgin franchise fiasco. The Association of Train Operating Companies has finally confirmed the extent of the hikes that will take effect next month