Is DNA key to an ideal workout? Scientists say genes determine fitness and create test to identify if someone is suited to sprints or marathons

Is DNA key to an ideal workout Scientists say genes determine fitness and create test to identify if someone is suited to sprints or marathons By Fiona Macrae PUBLISHED: 00:29 GMT, 25 April 2013 | UPDATED: 06:47 GMT, 25 April 2013 If you gamely go to the gym or perpetually pound the pavements but don’t seem to be getting any fitter, the answer could lie in your genes. Scientists say DNA is key to sporting ability – and they have created a genetic test that tells someone if they are better-suited to marathons or to the 100 metres. Billed as ‘the end of workouts that don’t work’, the 249 kit reads around 20 genes involved in how the body reacts to exercise, the risk of injury and how long it takes muscles to recover from exertion

Parents of medical student who died after taking weight loss pills reveal daughter was the "happiest she had ever been"

Parents of medical student who died after taking weight loss pills reveal daughter was the 'happiest she had ever been'Leeds University student Sarah Houston, 23, found dead in her bedroom The bulimia sufferer had secretly been taking banned weight loss aidDNP is used as a pesticide and traces of it were discovered in her blood ” class=”blkBorder” /> Games: The medical student plays in the street with local children in Guatamala during a visit in July 2012 Shame: Sarah was a beautiful, bright young woman, but always 'suffered from her image, her mother said On Monday, coroner David Hinchliff told an inquest it was ‘entirely’ responsible for her death last September when she collapsed in her room at the University of Leeds.

One in 10 Britons now eats three meals a day at work – and gains a STONE in weight as a result

One in 10 Britons now eats three meals a day at work – and gains a STONE in weight as a resultHalf of us eat both breakfast and lunch at our desksAnd tuck into our first snack by 10am20% of regularly raid the vending machine at work By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 18:24 GMT, 25 February 2013 | UPDATED: 03:02 GMT, 26 February 2013 Millions of workers are putting in such long hours they are eating breakfast, lunch and dinner at their desk, a survey has found. The mad dash to get to work in the morning means many of us grab something from the fridge and take it to work to eat on arrival. Most pop out to buy lunch before hurrying back to eat it at their desk in order to stay on top of the to-do list

A nation suffering from "fat blindness": Average Briton is only prompted to go on a diet once the scales tip 13st 10lb

A nation suffering from 'fat blindness': Average Briton is only prompted to go on a diet once the scales tip 13st 10lbsAverage 'trigger' weight has risen more than a stone in a decade, according to Weight Watchers Unflattering photographs are a key weight loss trigger A quarter of the population are classified as obese By Emily Payne PUBLISHED: 14:57 GMT, 21 February 2013 | UPDATED: 09:05 GMT, 22 February 2013 Many overweight people are suffering from 'fat blindness', say experts Britons are increasingly suffering from 'fat blindness' and are failing to lose weight until they are obese, experts have warned. Only when the scales tip 13st 10lb does the average person decide that enough is enough, new figures show. And seeing unflattering photographs is the first things that stirs us into action

Obese father-of-three, 37, loses EIGHTEEN stone in nine months after vowing to slim for his sons

'I was too ashamed to get the cancer test that could have saved my mother': Obese father-of-three, 37, loses EIGHTEEN stone in nine months after vowing to slim for his sons Wayne Robinson dropped from 31st to 13st after making a 'conscious effort to constantly avoid embarrassing situations' like parents evening Weight crept on after he lost his mother to bowel cancer Says shame over weight meant he resisted getting the cancer test himself – even though he knew early detection could have saved his mother Decided to slim down for the sake of his children Averaged half a stone weight loss per week By Bianca London PUBLISHED: 12:36 GMT, 4 January 2013 | UPDATED: 12:59 GMT, 4 January 2013 A man who was once too ashamed to be seen in public has found a new lease of life after losing an incredible 18st. Wayne Robinson, 31, from Carlisle, embarked upon a strict diet nine months ago after deciding he had had enough of missing out on life because of his size

Jo Swinson tells magazines not to promote "irresponsible" post-Christmas fad diets and weight loss tips

Don't write about fad diets': Women's minister tells magazines not to promote 'irresponsible' post-Christmas weight loss tips MP Jo Swinson urged magazines to ditch fad diets in new year editions In an open letter she said editors should encourage 'reasonable expectations' about weight loss | UPDATED: 10:42 GMT, 28 December 2012 Appeal: Jo Swinson co-founded the Campaign for Body Confidence Magazines have been urged to ditch New Year ‘miracle diets’ that promise to help readers shed the pounds they have piled on over the festive season. Jo Swinson, the Minister for Women and Equalities, claims such diets – which offer tips on how to lose up to a stone in a matter of days – encourage ‘dangerous’ behaviour and ‘self-hate’

Don"t write about fad diets": Women"s minister Jo Swinson tells magazines not to promote "irresponsible" post-Christmas…

Don't write about fad diets': Women's minister tells magazines not to promote 'irresponsible' post-Christmas weight loss tips MP Jo Swinson urged magazines to ditch fad diets in new year editions In an open letter she said editors should encourage 'reasonable expectations' about weight loss | UPDATED: 11:52 GMT, 27 December 2012 Appeal: Jo Swinson co-founded the Campaign for Body Confidence Magazines have been urged not to promote 'miracle diets' to people worrying about losing weight after Christmas indulgence. Minister for Women and Equalities Jo Swinson has written an open letter to women's, men's, health, celebrity and gossip magazines appealing for them to 'shed the fad diets and fitness myths' in their new year editions. She appealed to editors to drop 'irresponsible, short-term solutions' and promote ways to lose weight healthily

Surgeons face league table over death rates so patients can choose to have operations with the best specialists

Surgeons face league table over death rates so patients can choose to have operations with the best specialistsOnline comparisons to be published on NHS Choices website next summerWill include procedures such as hip replacements and weight-loss surgery By Sophie Borland PUBLISHED: 00:42 GMT, 19 December 2012 | UPDATED: 00:42 GMT, 19 December 2012 League tables are to be published to measure the performance of surgeons – including their patients’ survival rates. From next summer, online comparisons can be made of doctors who specialise in procedures including hip and knee replacements and weight-loss surgery. NHS officials say it will give patients more power and enable them to choose to have their operation carried out by a top surgeon at another hospital

Want your husband to lose a few pounds? The solution is to nag him about it

Want your husband to lose a few pounds The solution is to nag him about it | UPDATED: 22:07 GMT, 14 December 2012 When it comes to the challenge of losing weight, there’s nothing like having the backing and support of a loving partner. But it turns out the best way for a wife to persuade her husband to shed a few pounds may be to nag him about it as well. Research shows some men are much more likely to lose weight if their other halves criticise, confront and reject them, rather than offer sugar-coated encouragement.

A third of primary school children are overweight or obese

The fat timebomb: A THIRD of primary school children are now overweight or obese New NHS figures show 33.9 per cent of year six pupils weigh more than they shouldFifth of children in reception also overweight or obese Pupils in urban areas more likely to be larger than those in towns and suburbs | UPDATED: 11:26 GMT, 12 December 2012 A third of final year primary school children are overweight or obese, new figures suggest. Last year 33.9 per cent of Year Six pupils, aged 10 or 11, weighed more than they should – a slight increase from 33.4 per cent the previous year. The NHS Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) said year six pupils in urban areas were more likely to be obese than those who live in towns and suburbs.