Tom Maynard: Cricketer had taken cocaine, ecstasy and was 4 times the drink-drive limit when he was killed


Cricket star Tom Maynard had taken cocaine and ecstasy and was 4x drink-drive limit when he was killed by train while fleeing policeInquest hears it is not known if he was killed by impact or electrocutionThe cricket star took drugs before trying to drive, jury toldFled after officers pulled him over in Wimbledon last year
Surrey batsman was found dead on tracks at nearby Wimbledon Park
Was trying to see his girlfriend when police spotted him
Inquest heard he suffered burns consistent with injuries from live tracksTrain driver: 'He didn't look like he had fallen, but laid down'Girlfriend and England cricket players arrived at inquest this morning

, had played a T20
game for Surrey against Kent the day before his death and went out
drinking afterwards.

Surrey's Gareth Batty arrives at the Westminster Council Annex building in London for the inquest into the death of Surrey cricketer Tom Maynard

Surrey cricketer Tom Maynard who died after he was hit by a District Line train on the London Underground

Teammates: Surrey's Gareth Batty (left) arrives at the inquest this morning into the death of Surrey cricketer Tom Maynard (right), who died after he was hit by a London Underground train last June

Memorial: Tributes left to the cricketer behind the pavilion at The Oval, following his death in June last year

Memorial: Tributes left to the cricketer behind the pavilion at The Oval, following his death in June last year

'He left the pub with his two
flatmates, who were also his teammates, and went home where they
continued drinking', said Mr Goddard.

'Around 3.30am, he rang his partner saying he wanted to see her.'

After fleeing from police 45 minutes
later, in Arthur Road, Mr Maynard's motionless body was spotted on the
tracks at around 5am.

He suffered devastating injuries when the train hit him and was declared dead at the scene, near Wimbledon Park station.

Dr Poole told the inquest jury that Mr Maynard suffered burns to his feet, ankles and shin which were consistent with injuries suffered by skin touching live railway tracks.

It was not possible to say, however, whether electrocution or the impact with the train caused Mr Maynard's death, he added.

Pulled over: Police stopped Mr Maynard in Ryfold Road, but he ran off and was later found dead near Wimbledon Park tube station

Pulled over: Police stopped Mr Maynard in Ryfold Road, but he ran off and was later found dead near Wimbledon Park tube station

Scene: Mr Maynard was declared dead at the scene after he was hit by a train near Wimbledon Park Station

Scene: Mr Maynard was declared dead at the scene after he was hit by a train near Wimbledon Park Station

Mr Maynard's model girlfriend Carly Baker begged him not to drive to her house as she feared he would be pulled over by the police.

The cricketer, who had been dating the underwear model for a few weeks before his death, sounded depressed on the phone as he told her: 'You are the only one who makes me happy.'

Ms Baker said: 'Tom told me he had had a really sh**ty day, and that he felt unhappy.

'He said he wanted to come and see me, but I told him not to come round to my house as I thought he had been drinking.'

Mr Maynard ignored his girlfriend's pleas and got into his car, telling Ms Baker he was 'just around the corner' in their last call before he fled from police.

Good friends: Former Surrey captain Rory Hamilton-Brown, pictured arriving at the inquest today, said he had no idea Mr Maynard was a habitual cocaine and class A drug user

Good friends: Former Surrey captain Rory Hamilton-Brown, pictured arriving at the inquest today, said he had no idea Mr Maynard was a habitual cocaine and class A drug user

'I tried to persuade him not to come over, I was worried he would get in his car when he had been drinking', she said.

'He sounded very down and depressed on the phone, but he didn't want to put it all on me. For me to say what's wrong is unusual, because he usually has it all together. It was like he needed me, and said to me over and over you're the only one who makes me happy.'

When Mr Maynard failed to arrive at her home, a frantic Ms Baker ran into the street and called his phone around 50 times with no response. She eventually decided to go to Wandsworth Police Station to report her concerns.

Teammates and good friends Jade Dernbach and Rory Hamilton-Brown told the inquest they had no idea Mr Maynard was a habitual cocaine and class A drug user.

Coroner Dr Fiona Wilcox said: 'I understood the evidence to show that, certainly in the past three-and-a-half months, Mr Maynard had used cocaine on a daily basis'.

Mr Dernbach replied: 'I wasn't aware of that.'

Club captain Mr Hamilton-Brown, who lived with Mr Maynard and had known him since school, said there were no signs of him acting out of the ordinary.

'I always had him down as someone who I was jealous of his ability to combine highs and lows and manage to stay level', he said.

'I always had him down as a very level headed guy.'

The three cricketers had gone to a pub after the game on June 17, continued drinking at Mr Hamilton-Brown's home he shared with Mr Maynard, then headed to a club at around midnight.

The inquest heard Mr Maynard drank four beers, two shots, and as many as ten vodka red bulls in the session which concluded back at his home after the club. He was spotted leaving the house at around 3.15am to drive to see Ms Baker.

Mr Maynard was drunk but no more than anyone else in the party, said Mr Hamilton-Brown. Both he and Mr Dernbach denied seeing Mr Maynard taking drugs that night or knowing he had a drug habit.

Search: A CCTV image captures a police car as officers look for Mr Maynard after he fled from them

Search: A CCTV image captures a police car as officers look for Mr Maynard after he fled from them

The inquest also heard Mr Maynard had been disciplined by the club ten days before his death following an incident on a boozy night out in Brighton when he was hit by a car.

Mr Maynard suffered a black eye and an injured shoulder, and was keen to respond to the incident with a winning display on the cricket pitch, the hearing was told.

Mr Hamilton-Brown said players would go out on heavy drinking sessions after games, but would abstain from alcohol in the build-up to games.

'It wasn't a regular thing, it was invariably, at the right time', he said.

'After the game if we had the right time off, we would probably drink heavily.'

Motionless: Train driver Martin Hopping told the inquest the locomotive was travelling at 35mph when it hit Mr Maynard's body, which was motionless on the tracks

Motionless: Train driver Martin Hopping told the inquest the locomotive was travelling at 35mph when it hit Mr Maynard's body, which was motionless on the tracks

Police who pulled Mr Maynard over in Ryfold Road said he appeared nervous after being spotted driving erratically.

'I shouted: 'police mate, just wait there for a minute', said PC David Wishart.

'He did look quite nervous and uneasy, I thought he was going to say something and then he just ran off.'

PC Wishart's colleague gave chase up to Melrose Avenue, but lost sight of the cricketer. Other officers joined the search for him ten minutes later, but they could not find him.

PC Wishart said the Mercedes' engine was still running with the keys in the ignition, and a Blackberry was on the passenger seat logged in to Mr Maynard's Facebook profile.

Car: A black Mercedes belonging to Mr Maynard, in a police cordon just a few streets from where he died, in Wimbledon Park

Car: A black Mercedes belonging to Mr Maynard, in a police cordon just a few streets from where he died, in Wimbledon Park

While officers were at the scene, Mr Maynard phone rang repeatedly from a number stored as 'Lady Tiger'.

As this was said his girlfriend Carly
Baker, 25, wept uncontrollably and put her head in her hands. The
aspiring actress wept throughout the inquest.

As the officer left the scene, they saw paramedics and firefighters who had been called to the tracks near Wimbledon Park station where Mr Maynard's body had been hit by a train.

Train driver Martin Hopping said the locomotive was travelling at 35mph when it hit Mr Maynard's motionless body.

'I suddenly saw what looked like a white bag of ballast on the track ahead', he said.

'When I got two carriage lengths away, I saw it was one object laying across the rails rather than bags.'

Discovered: Mr Maynard's motionless body was spotted on the tracks at about 5am, after he had fled from police (file picture)

Discovered: Mr Maynard's motionless body was spotted on the tracks at about 5am, after he had fled from police (file picture)

Mr Hopping noticed a white trainer to the left of the body, and said: 'To my horror, for the first time I saw what it was, a person laying perfectly still stretched across all four rails.

'His head was facing away from me.

'I can picture it very clearly, and the impression I had was he didn't look like he had fallen, but rather the person had laid down.'

Mr Hopping pulled the emergency brake but was too late to avoid hitting Mr Maynard.

He said the cricketer's white t-shirt was 'grubby and not clean'.

'He was one of the people in life I would do absolutely anything for'

- Surrey County Cricket Club physio Alex Tysone

The Cardiff-born cricketer was described a 'sports-mad' by his father, former England and Glamorgan batsman Matthew Maynard, who said he had given up rugby and football to focus on succeeding in cricket.

'Tom was a highly talented, dedicated, and respected sportsman and student of cricket', he said.

'He always had time for people and was spending time with supporters.'

His father added: 'He enjoyed
socialising and had a capacity for drinking alcohol at the right time to
enjoy himself and relax.'

Surrey County Cricket Club physio Alex Tysone paid a moving tribute to Mr Maynard who 'lived life to the maximum' and united the team's dressing room.

'What was clear from the start was that Tom was a very open, friendly lad, who was also gentle, funny, and intelligent', he said.

Tribute: Tom Maynard 'lived life to the maximum' and united the dressing room at Surrey County Cricket Club, physio Alex Tysone said

Tribute: Tom Maynard 'lived life to the maximum' and united the dressing room at Surrey County Cricket Club, physio Alex Tysone said

'What I really liked was, for a bloke with the looks, the chat, and all the talent, there was not a single arrogant bone in his body. He radiated warmth and made it easy to relax in his company right from the start.'

Mr Tysone met Mr Maynard in 2010 when he played for Glamorgan, and welcomed him to the club when he moved to Surrey the following year.

'He became the centre and life of the place, and did this without even trying', he said.

'Such was Tom's ability to bring people together with friendship, laughter, and he led from the front with his cricket performances.'

Mr Tysone described his 'infectious' laughter, and added: 'He was one of the people in life I would do absolutely anything for.'

He said he took any necessary medicine without question and had a 'very serious side to him' when it came to cricket.

'This was reflected in the way Tom went about his cricket', he said.

'When he went on to the field, you known he would play to the maximum, was the first name on the team sheet in all formats.

'God only knows where his talent would have taken him.'

A charitable trust to aid young sportsmen was set up in the wake of his death.

Mr Maynard's career began in Glamorgan and he toured with the England Lions in 2011-12.

He was a right-handed batsman who
scored 2,384 first class runs and a right-arm off-break bowler. He
earned himself a place on the England Lions tour to Bangladesh and Sri
Lanka at the start of this year. He moved to The Oval to join Surrey at
the start of last season.

Mr Maynard, from Wandsworth, southwest London, died of multiple injuries.

The inquest continues