Why the Monday blues means you should make your doctor"s appointment for the end of the week

Why the Monday blues means you should make doctors appointments for the end of the week Appointments made for the beginning of the week were missed more often than those at the endPatients may feel less able to cope with the prospect of being given bad news at the start of the working weekShifting appointments to Thursday and Friday could save NHS 60m a year, claim experts | UPDATED: 11:24 GMT, 17 December 2012 When booking a GP appointment, your best bet is to avoid the start of the week. For a study has found this is when patients are most likely to miss their consultations due to Monday morning blues. Study author Dr Rob Jenkins, from Glasgow University, said: 'Mondays are worst for missed appointments

NHS doctors to be forced to work weekends for the first time in push for improved seven-day a week care

NHS doctors to be forced to work weekends for the first time in push for improved seven-day a week care Oupatients appointments and surgical procedures could be carried out on Saturdays and Sundays for the first timeThe shake up is part of plans by Sir Bruce Keogh, medical director of the new NHS Commissioning Board | UPDATED: 23:19 GMT, 16 December 2012 Seven days: Sir Bruce Keogh plans to introduce seven day working to the NHS Doctors could be forced to work at weekends under plans to create a health service with supermarket-style opening hours. Sir Bruce Keogh, the NHS’s medical director, said that patients, like shoppers, should be entitled to the same quality of service on Saturday and Sunday as during the week. He said it was no longer acceptable for hospitals and GPs’ surgeries to operate for the convenience of their staff at the expense of patients and that clinics and day case operations should be available seven days a week.

Miscarriage conveyor belt: Women in depths of despair are treated heartlessly by NHS staff, says watchdog

Miscarriage conveyor belt: Women in depths of despair are treated heartlessly by NHS staff, says watchdog A report by Nice says that patients who have lost their baby are often dealt with by 'insensitive' doctors, nurses and receptionistsMany are left to wait on wards where they can hear others giving birth, according to the report | UPDATED: 23:17 GMT, 11 December 2012 Distress: Women who suffer miscarriages are often dealt with by 'insensitive' doctors, nurses and receptionists, according to a new report Women who suffer miscarriages are being treated in a heartless ‘conveyor belt’ system, according to the NHS watchdog. Its report says patients who have lost their baby are often dealt with by ‘insensitive’ doctors, nurses and receptionists