Two-thirds of us hate it when cold callers use our first names

First name terms No, Mr and Mrs to you: Two-thirds of us hate it when cold callers use our first names Poll finds three in ten people fed up with strangers treating them like friends One in five objected to Facebook's 'how's it going' messages Most traditional views held in Wales, while Scottish are more relaxed By Claire Ellicott PUBLISHED: 00:37 GMT, 2 April 2013 | UPDATED: 17:23 GMT, 2 April 2013 A survey found almost two-thirds of us hate cold callers who address customers by their first name Answering the phone halfway through dinner to a cold caller trying to sell you things you’ll never want or need is bad enough. What’s worse When they use your first name to do it. Almost two-thirds of us hate cold callers who address customers by their first name and start conversations with ‘hi’, a study found.

The not-so-Supernanny: Mothers blast Jo Frost"s "dangerous" advice on moving toddlers from cot to bed

The not-so-Supernanny: Mothers blast star's 'dangerous' advice on moving toddlers from a cot to a bed Jo Frost said children should stay in a cot until they outgrow it in new book Mothers on Netmums website say toddlers could fall and hurt themselves'This is one time when you need to ignore Jo Frost,' one user posted By Laura Cox PUBLISHED: 00:50 GMT, 30 March 2013 | UPDATED: 17:01 GMT, 30 March 2013 No-nonsense approach: Jo Frost has been criticised for her views on when a child should be moved from a cot to a bed She can rein in the unruliest of toddlers, tame ugly tantrums, and – seemingly without effort – has calmed many a nightmarish household overrun by naughty children. But, as Supernanny Jo Frost has discovered, woe betide anyone who comes between mothers’ groups and their views on certain parenting milestones

Facebook and Twitter crime sees eight-fold increase as police deal with 5,000 cases involving websites

5,000 people investigated by police for something they said on Facebook or Twitter as 'social network crime' soars 800% Crimes include posting menacing messages, and sexual offences such as grooming In 2008 there were just 556 reports of crimes; last year there were 4,908In 2011, 653 people were charged for crimes involving Facebook and Twitter Police: 'Officers should only respond to complaints that cause genuine harm' | UPDATED: 22:26 GMT, 27 December 2012 Reports of crimes involving Facebook and Twitter – such as posting abusive messages, grooming and complaints of stalking – have increased eight-fold in four years.

Everyone is to blame but me, insists Patten: BBC chairman faces calls to resign after blasting MPs, the Press and even his own lawyers over…

Everyone is to blame but me, insists Patten: BBC chairman faces calls to resign after blasting MPs, the Press and even his own lawyers over Entwistle's 450,000 payout Entwistle was paid to leave the BBC in November after 54 days in the jobHe was also handed private healthcare for a year, legal fees and a PR budget as part of the dealBBC Trust chair Lord Patten says they are looking into getting some of the Entwistle money back after damning Pollard review The peer also admits he chose the wrong man when he employed him as Director-GeneralMPs looking at the pay-off said it was an 'unacceptable use of public money' Labour's Margaret Hodge goes to war with BBC over pay and gold-plated benefits of its senior staff | UPDATED: 07:54 GMT, 21 December 2012 BBC chairman Lord Patten faced renewed calls to resign yesterday after he accused a parliamentary committee of ‘shabby’ treatment when it criticised ex-director-general George Entwistle’s bumper payoff. The Tory peer clashed with Labour MP Margaret Hodge, chairman of the Public Accounts Committee, over a report which attacked the ‘cavalier’ use of public money to give Mr Entwistle a ‘reward for failure’ after a mere 54 days in the job.

Could your genes be responsible for how intensely you feel pain?

Could your genes be responsible for how intensely you feel painPeople who feel pain less intensely could have genes that work together to regulate painThose sensitive to pain are more likely to go on to develop chronic pain | UPDATED: 22:36 GMT, 20 December 2012 Sensitivity to pain is all in the genes, according to a new study. People who feel pain less intensely could have a particular set of genes that work together to regulate pain, claims a study published in the journal PLOS Genetics