Police must not treat 17-year-olds like adults, High Court rules in blow to Home Secretary"s custody rules

Police must not treat 17-year-olds like adults, High Court rules in blow to Home Secretary's custody rules High Court rules that 17-year-olds must have the same protections as children in custodyTheresa May has opposed a change in the lawParents of children who committed suicide after run-ins with police By Matt Chorley, Mailonline Political Editor PUBLISHED: 10:31 GMT, 25 April 2013 | UPDATED: 11:22 GMT, 25 April 2013 Police must not treat 17-year-olds as adults when taken into custody under a High Court ruling today.

Abu Qatada"s presence here is reassuring, claims top Liberal Democrat

Abu Qatada's presence here is reassuring, claims top Liberal Democrat Justice Minister Lord McNally said the legal protection preventing Abu Qatada's deportation is 'part of what makes us a civilised society'Seven-year bid to deport him has cost taxpayers 500K in legal aid aloneGovernment has made a new attempt to deport the radical preacher By Jason Groves PUBLISHED: 03:38 GMT, 12 March 2013 | UPDATED: 08:14 GMT, 12 March 2013 Britain's inability to deport hate preacher Abu Qatada shows the controversial Human Rights Act is ‘working’, a senior Liberal Democrat minister has claimed. In an astonishing intervention, Justice Minister Lord McNally said the legal protection given to the man once dubbed Osama bin Laden’s right-hand man in Europe was ‘part of what makes us a civilised society’.

Human right judges go too far, says Grayling as he ratchets up hostilities with Strasbourg court

Human right judges go too far, says Grayling as he ratchets up hostilities with Strasbourg courtJustice Secretary says European human rights judges are interfering with domestic issuesThey have 'lost sight' of the core principles behind human rightsRights are 'too open to abuse', Mr Grayling added | UPDATED: 08:01 GMT, 18 December 2012 Broadside: Conservative Justice Secretary Chris Grayling has accused European lawmakers of overstepping their authority and deciding matters best left to domestic courts A senior cabinet minister last night accused European human rights judges of ‘overstepping the mark’ – in a significant ratcheting up of hostilities with the Strasbourg court. Justice Secretary Chris Grayling’s remarks are the strongest condemnation to date of the controversial court from a Tory minister. He accuses the judges of prying ‘more and more’ into areas that should be decided in domestic courts or by MPs in Parliament