Care worker, 25, almost blinded and loses eyebrows for life after they were tinted with chemicals at beauty salon

Care worker, 25, almost blinded and loses eyebrows for life after they were tinted with chemicals at beauty salonNatasha Henshaw, 25, left in agony after waxing sessionTreatment left pores open before tint was appliedDoctors say it is unlikely her eyebrows will grow back PUBLISHED: 12:49 GMT, 18 December 2012 | UPDATED: 13:19 GMT, 18 December 2012 A mother-of-one has had her eyebrows permanently burned off during a bungled routine tinting session. Care worker Natasha Henshaw was nearly blinded when the tint was applied after her eyebrows had been waxed, leaving her pores open to the chemicals The 25-year-old from Dingle, Liverpool, was left in searing pain and awoke the next day to find her eyebrows 'scattered all over' her face. Doctors say it is unlikely her eyebrows will ever grow back.

"Jesus was gay"! Church sparks outrage with claim son of God "should come out"

'Jesus was gay'! Church sparks outrage with claim son of God 'should come out'Reverend claims controversial billboard is mean to 'lift' humanity of Jesus | UPDATED: 13:12 GMT, 17 December 2012 It is the season of glad tidings and forgiveness. But many Christians living in Auckland, New Zealand, are struggling to find goodwill in their hearts for the latest in a series of controversial billboards coming out from the Church of St Matthew in the City. 'It's Christmas.

Downton Abbey Christmas Special: Hoots m"lud! Nessie"s in McDownton

Hoots m'lud! Nessie's in McDownton | UPDATED: 09:17 GMT, 13 December 2012 Apparently, the Downton Abbey Christmas Special finds the entire Grantham household transplanted to Scotland. They have decamped to Duneagle Castle, home of the Marquess of Flintshire.

A 500 pony, 18,000 in cash and body armour worth 8,000: Incredible list of MoD thefts costing 270,000 in just SIX months

A 500 pony, 18,000 in cash and body armour worth 8,000: Incredible list of MoD thefts costing 270,000 in just SIX months Catalogue of equipment stolen from April to September includes a pony taken by a soldier – who has now left the forcesThieves made off with uniforms, helmets, flags, tools and silverwareMinistry of Defence hit by metal thefts with copper, lead and brass stolenBikes, boats and Land Rovers also targeted but MoD insists many items are recoveredLabour MP Madeleine Moon says MoD bosses need to check what leaves as well as what arrives at military basesDefence Police Federation warns officers are only called in 'when the trail has gone cold' | UPDATED: 16:10 GMT, 3 December 2012 A pony worth 500 was among 270,000 of Ministry of Defence equipment recorded stolen from April to September (file image) A pony worth 500 was among more than 270,000 worth of military property reported stolen in just six months, it emerged today. It is understood the horse was taken by a serving member of the armed forces, but has since been recovered. But as fresh details emerged about the incredible catalogue of military equipment, clothing, silverware, tools, medals and flags which have been stolen, the Ministry of Defence was accused of being too focused on arrivals on military bases and not on what leaves.

Leveson Report: Investigative journalists who breach data protection rules could face 2 years in jail

Investigative journalists who breach data protection rules could face two years’ jail Leveson suggests what opponents immediately described as 'chilling' changes to protections given to journalists handling 'private' informationDavid Cameron said he was 'instinctively concerned' about the plans | UPDATED: 10:16 GMT, 30 November 2012 Lord Justice Leveson suggests what opponents immediately described as 'chilling' changes to protections given to journalists who are handling 'private' information Investigative journalists who breach data protection rules could be jailed for two years under proposals in the Leveson report. The judge also suggests what opponents immediately described as ‘chilling’ changes to protections given to journalists who are handling ‘private’ information