New brain "injection" treatment gives hope to 20,000 stroke sufferers

New brain 'injection' treatment gives hope to 20,000 stroke sufferersGroundbreaking new treatment dissolves 'golf ball-sized' clotsPatients who use drugs had less disability a year later, study saysClots removed in 50 per cent of patients given medication, compared to just 5 per cent receiving standard care By Jenny Hope PUBLISHED: 01:26 GMT, 8 February 2013 | UPDATED: 07:58 GMT, 8 February 2013 Groundbreaking: New treatment which sees drugs inserted in the brain of stroke victims could help thousands who suffer a brain haemorrhage (file picture Surgeons are inserting drugs in the brain of stroke victims to dissolve ‘golf ball-sized’ clots in a groundbreaking new treatment. The technique could help thousands of patients who suffer a bleeding stroke, or brain haemorrhage, for which there is currently no surgical treatment

The cyber road test that stops teenage drivers making the mistake that left me paralysed for life

New weapon in the war against the biggest killer of young people: The cyber road test that stops teenage drivers making the mistake that left me paralysed for life | UPDATED: 22:29 GMT, 29 December 2012 Like most teenagers who have just passed their driving test, Lauren Eade is keen to get behind the wheel as often as possible. So she sets off one crisp winter afternoon – and I am beside her

Your very own eye phone! The contact lens that can receive your text messages

Your very own eye phone! The contact lens that can receive your text messages Text messages and images can be projected directly on to the lens using wireless technology Researchers at Ghent University believe the lens could be available to the public in just a few year By Daily Mail Reporter PUBLISHED: 21:06 GMT, 8 December 2012 | UPDATED: 00:32 GMT, 9 December 2012 It may sound like something out of a sci-fi film, but reading text messages off contact lens in the eyes could soon be a reality – bringing a whole new meaning to the term 'instant messaging'. Scientists have developed a new technology that allows electronic messages sent from mobile phones to be directly projected on to contact lens placed in the recipient's eyes. The spherical curved LCD display, created by Belgium researchers at Ghent University, handle projected images using wireless technology