Lars Hedegaard: Writer who was fined for making insulting remarks about Islam survives assassination attempt

'The bullet flew past my ear': Danish writer who was fined for making insulting remarks about Islam narrowly survives doorstep assassination attemptGunman rang doorbell of Lars Hedegaard's apartment in CopenhagenFired a bullet that narrowly missed the 70-year-old's headWould-be assassin fled after Mr Hedegaard punched him in the facePolice searching for 'foreign' man aged between 20 and 25 By Kerry Mcdermott PUBLISHED: 19:09 GMT, 5 February 2013 | UPDATED: 23:51 GMT, 5 February 2013 A writer and outspoken critic of Islam narrowly escaped being shot dead after he opened his door to a would-be assassin posing as a delivery man at his home in Denmark. The gunman rang the doorbell of 70-year-old Lars Hedegaard's apartment in Frederiksberg, Copenhagen, under the pretext of delivering a parcel, but when the writer opened his front door the hitman pulled out a weapon and fired a shot that just missed Mr Hedegaard's head. According to Mr Hedegaard, who described how the bullet 'flew past' his right ear, said the sniper fled after the writer punched him in the face causing him to drop his gun.

Keir Starmer QC: Backs free speech by saying it"s OK to offend people

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Scrap law on "insulting words and behaviour" that censors free speech, MPs urge

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